Please note:  These minutes are yet to be confirmed as a true record of proceedings

CITY OF BUSSELTON

MINUTES FOR THE Council  MEETING HELD ON 12 August 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM NO.                                        SUBJECT                                                                                                                              PAGE NO.

1....... Declaration of Opening and Announcement of Visitors. 3

2....... Attendance. 3

3....... Prayer. 4

4....... Public Question Time. 4

Response to Previous Questions Taken on Notice. 4

Public Question Time. 4

5....... Announcements Without Discussion.. 4

Announcements by the Presiding Member. 4

Announcements by other Members at the invitation of the Presiding Member. 4

6....... Application for Leave of Absence. 4

7....... Petitions and Presentations. 4

8....... Disclosure Of Interests. 4

9....... Confirmation and Receipt Of Minutes. 5

9.1          Minutes of the Council  held on 22 July 2015. 5

9.2          Minutes of the Special Council held on 23 July 2015. 5

9.3          Minutes of the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee held 14 July 2015. 5

9.4          Minutes of the Policy and Legislation Committee held 30 July 2015. 6

10..... Reports of Committee. 8

10.1        Meelup Regional Park Management Committee - 14/07/2015 - PROPOSED WHALE VIEWING PLATFORM POINT PIQUET. 8

10.2        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ADOPTION OF POLICIES FOR BUSH FIRE BRIGADES. 13

10.3        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ORGANISATION WIDE RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY. 61

10.4        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY. 65

10.5        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - PROPOSED DELEGATION TO CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER TO AWARD TENDERS RELATING TO THE AIRPORT REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT. 158

11..... Planning and Development Services Report. 70

11.1        AMENDMENT NO. 16 TO LOCAL PLANNING SCHEME 21 - RECODE PORTION OF LOT 519 BELL DRIVE, BROADWATER FROM 'RESIDENTIAL R20' TO 'RESIDENTIAL R40' 70

11.2        PROPOSED STRATEGIC PURCHASE OF LOT 40 VASSE HIGHWAY, BOVELL FOR FUTURE USE AS ACTIVE SPORTING AND RECREATION AREA (SOUTHERN EXPANSION OF SIR STEWART BOVELL PARK). 75

11.3        MANAGEMENT OF DOGS IN PUBLIC PLACES, INCLUDING BEACHES - CONSIDERATION OF REVISED PROPOSALS RELATING TO SMITHS BEACH, EAGLE BAY AND OLD DUNSBOROUGH ONLY, FOLLOWING CONSULTATION.. 146

11.4        PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO LOCAL PLANNING POLICY 4B - URBAN CENTRES POLICY: PORT GEOGRAPHE VILLAGE CENTRE - DESIGN GUIDELINES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS AND PRECINCT PLAN - CONSIDERATION OF ADOPTION FOR FINAL APPROVAL. 88

12..... Engineering and Works Services Report. 94

12.1        DUNSBOROUGH REGION BOATING FACILITY PLANNING STUDY - COMMUNITY CONSULTATION FEEDBACK. 162

12.2        BUSSELTON TRAFFIC STUDY. 173

12.3        UPGRADE OF RURAL SINGLE LANE LINKAGE ROADS. 94

12.4        WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY. 107

12.5        REGIONAL WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY. 115

12.6        SOUTH WEST WASTE TO ENERGY. 120

12.7        AWARD OF TENDER RFT08/15 URBAN/RURAL TREE PRUNING  & CHIPPING SERVICES. 128

13..... Community and Commercial Services Report. 152

13.1        PROPOSED DEED OF AGREEMENT TO FACILITATE BUILDING EXTENSIONS TO THE EQUINOX CAFE AND RESTAURANT ON LOT 3001 (2 QUEEN STREET BUSSELTON). 152

14..... Finance and Corporate Services Report. 132

14.1        NBN COMMUNICATIONS TOWER, CREEKVIEW RESERVE. 140

14.2        DUNSBOROUGH & DISTRICTS COUNTRY CLUB INC LEASED AREA.. 132

14.3        ALTERATION TO MEMORANDUM OF IMPOSING RATES AND CHARGES 2015/16. 193

15..... Chief Executive Officer's Report. 137

15.1        COUNCILLORS' INFORMATION BULLETIN.. 137

16..... Motions of which Previous Notice has been Given.. 196

Nil

17..... Confidential Reports. 196

Nil

18..... Public Question Time. 196

19..... Next Meeting Date. 196

20..... Closure. 196

 


Council                                                                                      3                                                                    12 August 2015

MINUTES

 

MINUTES OF A Meeting of the Busselton City Council HELD IN the Council Chambers, Administration Building, Southern Drive, Busselton, ON 12 August 2015 AT 5.30pm .

 

1.               Declaration of Opening and Announcement of Visitors

The Presiding Member opened the meeting at 5.30pm.

2.               Attendance

Presiding Member:

Members:

 

Cr Ian Stubbs           Mayor

Cr Grant Henley

Cr John McCallum

Cr Tom Tuffin

Cr Gordon Bleechmore

Cr Rob Bennett

Cr Coralie Tarbotton

Cr Jenny Green

Cr Terry Best

 

Officers:

 

Mr Mike Archer, Chief Executive Officer

Mr Oliver Darby, Director, Engineering and Works Services

Mr Paul Needham, Director, Planning and Development Services

Mrs Naomi Searle, Director, Community and Commercial Services

Mr Matthew Smith, Director, Finance and Corporate Services

Miss Lynley Rich, Manager, Governance Services

Mrs Katie Banks, Administration Officer, Governance

 

Apologies

 

Nil

 

Approved Leave of Absence

 

Nil

 

Media:

 

“Busselton-Dunsborough Times”

“Busselton-Dunsborough Mail”

 

Public:

 

3


 

3.               Prayer

Councillor Grant Henley recited ‘The Ode of Remembrance’, in acknowledgement of the Centenary of the battle at Lone Pine.

4.               Public Question Time

Response to Previous Questions Taken on Notice

 

Nil 

Public Question Time

 

Nil

5.               Announcements Without Discussion

Announcements by the Presiding Member 

 

Nil

Announcements by other Members at the invitation of the Presiding Member

 

Nil

6.               Application for Leave of Absence

Nil

7.               Petitions and Presentations

7.1             Petitions –

 

A petition seeking Council’s support of a Master Plan for horse-riding trails in the City of Busselton, containing 284 signatures was presented which stated:

“We, the undersigned hereby respectfully request that the City of Busselton sanction (in writing to the South West Capes Bridle Trails Association) support of a Master Plan for horse-riding trails in the City of Busselton.”

 

Council Decision

C1508/209              Moved Councillor R Bennett, seconded Councillor T Best

 

That the petition be received.

CARRIED 9/0

8.               Disclosure Of Interests

The Mayor noted that a declaration of financial interest had been received from:

 

·         Cr Tom Tuffin in relation to Agenda Item 14.1 - NBN COMMUNICATIONS TOWER, CREEKVIEW RESERVE.

 

The Mayor advised that in accordance with the Local Government (Rules of Conduct) Regulations 2007 this declaration would be read out immediately before Item 14.1 was discussed.

 

The Mayor also noted that a declaration of impartiality interest had been received from:

 

·         Cr John McCallum in relation to Agenda Item 14.2 - DUNSBOROUGH & DISTRICTS COUNTRY CLUB INC LEASED AREA.

 

The Mayor advised that in accordance with the Local Government (Rules of Conduct) Regulations 2007 this declaration would be read out immediately before Item 14.2 was discussed.

9.               Confirmation and Receipt Of Minutes 

Previous Council Meetings

9.1             Minutes of the Council  held on 22 July 2015

Council Decision

C1508/210              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor G Bleechmore

That the Minutes of the Council  Meeting held 22 July 2015 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

CARRIED 9/0

9.2             Minutes of the Special Council held on 23 July 2015

Council Decision

C1508/211              Moved Councillor C Tarbotton, seconded Councillor J McCallum

That the Minutes of the Special Council Meeting held 23 July 2015 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

CARRIED 9/0

 Committee Meetings

9.3             Minutes of the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee held 14 July 2015

Council Decision

C1508/212              Moved Councillor G Bleechmore, seconded Councillor J McCallum

 

1)        That the minutes of a meeting of the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee held on 14 July 2015 be received.

 

2)        That the Council notes the outcomes of the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee meeting held on 14 July 2015 being:

 

a)            The Proposed Whale Vieweing Platform Point Piquet Item is presented for Council  consideration at Item 10.1 of this agenda             

 

b)            The Committee noted the Environment Officer’s report.

CARRIED 9/0

 


 

9.4             Minutes of the Policy and Legislation Committee held 30 July 2015 

Council Decision

C1508/213              Moved Councillor G Bleechmore, seconded Councillor J McCallum

 

1)    That the minutes of a meeting of the Policy and Legislation Committee held on 30 July 2015 be received.

 

2)    That the Council notes the outcomes of the Policy and Legislation Committee meeting held on 30 July being:

a)    The Adoption of Policies for Bush Fire Brigades Item is presented for Council consideration at Item 10.2 of this agenda.

 

b)    The Organisation Wide Risk Management Policy Item is presented for Council consideration at Item 10.3 of this agenda.

 

c)    The Occupational Safety and Health Policy Item is presented for Council consideration at Item 10.4 of this agenda.

 

d)    The Proposed Delegation to Chief Executive Officer to Award Tenders Relating to the Airport Redevelopment Project Item is presented for Council consideration at Item 10.5 of this agenda.

 

e)    Officers with the Committee discussed the City Centres Façade Refurbishment Subsidy Program and the proposed form of recognition for the City’s contribution to the subsidy.

CARRIED 9/0

 


 

Adoption by Exception Resolution

At this juncture the Mayor advised the meeting that the below reports, including the Committee and Officer Recommendations, will be adopted en bloc.

En Bloc Motion

 

Council Decision

C1508/214              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Committee and Officer Recommendations in relation to the following agenda items be carried en bloc:

10.1        Meelup Regional Park Management Committee - 14/07/2015 - PROPOSED WHALE VIEWING PLATFORM POINT PIQUET

10.2        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ADOPTION OF POLICIES FOR BUSH FIRE BRIGADES

10.3        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ORGANISATION WIDE RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY

10.4        Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY

11.1        AMENDMENT NO. 16 TO LOCAL PLANNING SCHEME 21 - RECODE PORTION OF LOT 519 BELL DRIVE, BROADWATER FROM 'RESIDENTIAL R20' TO 'RESIDENTIAL R40'

11.2        PROPOSED STRATEGIC PURCHASE OF LOT 40 VASSE HIGHWAY, BOVELL FOR FUTURE USE AS ACTIVE SPORTING AND RECREATION AREA (SOUTHERN EXPANSION OF SIR STEWART BOVELL PARK)

11.4        PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO LOCAL PLANNING POLICY 4B - URBAN CENTRES POLICY: PORT GEOGRAPHE VILLAGE CENTRE - DESIGN GUIDELINES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS AND PRECINCT PLAN - CONSIDERATION OF ADOPTION FOR FINAL APPROVAL

12.3        UPGRADE OF RURAL SINGLE LANE LINKAGE ROADS

12.4        WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY

12.5        REGIONAL WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

12.6        SOUTH WEST WASTE TO ENERGY

12.7        AWARD OF TENDER RFT08/15 URBAN/RURAL TREE PRUNING  & CHIPPING SERVICES

14.2        DUNSBOROUGH & DISTRICTS COUNTRY CLUB INC LEASED AREA

15.1        COUNCILLORS' INFORMATION BULLETIN

CARRIED 9/0

EN BLOC

 


Council                                                                                      9                                                                    12 August 2015

10.             Reports of Committee

10.1           Meelup Regional Park Management Committee - 14/07/2015 - PROPOSED WHALE VIEWING PLATFORM POINT PIQUET

SUBJECT INDEX:

Committee Meetings

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

Our natural environment is cared for and enhanced for the enjoyment of the community and visitors.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Environmental Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Meelup Regional Park

REPORTING OFFICER:

Meelup Environment Officer - Mandy Polley

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Planning and Development Services - Paul Needham

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   MRP Coastal Nodes Master Plan Concept Plan

Attachment b    Point Piquet Whale Platform Design & Construction Plans  

 

This item was considered by the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee at its meeting on 14 July 2015, the recommendations from which have been included in this report. 

 

PRÉCIS

 

A concept design and construction drawings have been developed for a proposed Whale viewing platform to be established at Point Picquet. This report recommends that the proposed Whale viewing platform concept design and construction drawings (Attachment B) be advertised for a period of four weeks to give the community opportunity to comment on the proposal.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Since 2004, community volunteers from Dunsborough Coast and Land Care Inc (D-CALC), in partnership with Western Whale Research, have been using Point Picquet during the whale migration season as the vantage point for monitoring the whales’ southwards passage through Geographe Bay. This land-based monitoring forms part of a wider research program undertaken by SouWEST as part of a south west whale ecology study. SouWEST was formed in 2010, it is a collaborative science program which integrates the research expertise of Western Whale Research the Centre for Marine Science and Technology at Curtin University and the community through D-CALC, to monitor whale sightings as part of a program for the long-term conservation of whales and their critical habitats in South Western Australia.

 

In April 2013, D-CALC approached the Committee with a proposal to construct a whale viewing platform at Point Picquet to assist their whale monitoring program and for the benefit the wider public as this location provides a unique ocean vantage point of Geographe Bay. The D-CALC proposal was presented at the May 2013 Committee meeting and Committee recommendation (MP1305/010) from that meeting is as follows:

 

That the Committee provides in‐principle support for the whale watching deck and walkway, according to the following guidelines:

1.         That DCALC consults with the Meelup Regional Park Committee on the project’s development and implementation;

2.         That the materials used for the decking and walkway are consistent with those recommended in the Meelup Beach Master Plan; and

3.       That the design of the decking fits into the existing granite rocks to create an organic shape that fits into the landscape, rather than a rectangularshaped decking.

In December 2013, Council resolved (resolution C1312/324) to endorse the Meelup Regional Park Coastal Nodes Master Plan; as an informing strategy for the purpose of planning and managing the Meelup Regional Park.

 

The Coastal Nodes Master Plan was developed to guide the sensitive development of the Meelup Regional Park coastal nodes and it acknowledged the D-CALC proposal for a whale viewing platform at Point Picquet. The Coastal Nodes Master Plan concept for the upgrade of Point Picquet carpark and surrounds includes an indicative location for the platform at Point Picquet and a notation that the feasibility of a whale viewing platform be investigated further in consultation with D-CALC. The Meelup Regional Park Coastal Nodes Master Plan concept plan (presented to Council December 2013) indicated a location for a future Whale viewing platform at Point Picquet and is attached  Attachment A.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

The Council has appointed a Meelup Regional Park Management Committee, in accordance with Section 5.8 of the Local Government Act 1995, to care for, control and manage Meelup Regional Park. The Committee has delegated authority in accordance with Section 5.16 of the Act to undertake these management activities and a budget is allocated by the Council for this purpose.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The park is managed on behalf of the City of Busselton by the Meelup Regional Park Management Committee in accordance with the Meelup Regional Park Management Plan (2010); approved by both the Council and the Minister for Lands. The Committee is charged with managing the park for conservation and environmental enhancement and allowing recreation and other uses to occur, to the extent that they do not impair the conservation values of the park.

 

The Meelup Regional Park Management Plan (2010) does not specifically address coastal management prompting the development of the Meelup Regional Park Coastal Nodes Master Plan in 2013, to guide the sensitive development of the Meelup Regional Park coastal nodes and to manage the impacts that result from increasing visitation to the Park’s coastal areas including Point Picquet.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Following advice that the City was eligible for funding under the Federal Governments National Landcare Programme (Whale and Dolphin Protection Plan), an application to the National Landcare Programme resulted in the City receiving an offer of $25,000 towards the establishment of a whale viewing platform.

 

In April 2015, Council amended its 2014/15 Budget to receive the $25,000 National Landcare grant as revenue towards the establishment of a whale viewing platform. Expenditure for construction of the Whale viewing platform is identified in the 2015/16 Draft Budget.

 

D-CALC has indicated their intent to contribute funds that they raised towards the whale viewing platform, for the installation interpretive signage. Interpretive signage will need to be appropriate for this sensitive location and will be the subject of a further report to the Committee.

 


 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

This matter is considered relevant to Key Goal Area 5 ‐ Cared for and Enhanced Environment and Community Objective 5.1 ‐ Our natural environment is cared for and enhanced for the enjoyment of the community and visitors.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

An assessment of the potential implication of implementing the officer recommendation has been undertaken using the City’s risk assessment framework. The assessment sought to identify ‘downside’ risks only rather than ‘upside’ risks and where the risk, following implementation of controls has been identified, is medium or greater. No such risks were identified.

 

CONSULTATION

 

The advertised (September 2012) Meelup Regional Park Coastal Nodes Master Plan concept design for the upgrade of Point Picquet carpark and surrounds, included an indicative location at Point Picquet for the establishment of a Whale viewing platform.  Notation on the Plan alerted readers that the feasibility of a whale viewing platform will be further investigated in consultation with D-CALC. Given no submissions were received in response to the advertising of the Master Plan, objecting to establishing a Whale viewing platform, that Point Picquet is both the preferred location for the SouWest Whale monitoring activities and a supported location.  No evaluation of other locations is required or has been undertaken.

 

The notation in the Meelup Regional Park Coastal Nodes Master Plan that the feasibility of a whale viewing platform be investigated further in consultation with D-CALC, resulted in the formation of a working group to progress the design for the whale viewing platform at Point Picquet. The Whale viewing platform working group comprised:

·    One City Environmental Officer and Meelup Environment Officer

·    One Dunsborough Coast and Landcare  Group representative

·    Two Meelup Regional Park Management Committee representative

In May 2015 the proposed site for the establishment of a Whale viewing platform at Point Picquet was inspected by representatives of the Nyungar community as part of an Aboriginal heritage assessment. No Aboriginal heritage sites or places were found to be located within the proposed Point Picquet Whale viewing platform area. The assessment concluded that the proposed Whale viewing platform would have a low key impact on the environment and recommended that the City of Busselton proceed with the proposal to construct a Whale viewing platform at Point Picquet without risk of breaching Section 17 of the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 in relation to Aboriginal heritage sites/places as defined by Section 5 of the Act.

 

The working group has developed a concept design and construction drawings for a proposed Whale viewing platform to be located at Point Picquet a copy of which is provided with this report as Attachment B.

 

This report recommends that the proposed Whale viewing platform concept design and construction drawings (Attachment B) be advertised for a period of four weeks to give the community opportunity to comment on the proposal. Following this advertising period a further report will be prepared which will include all submissions received and a Committee recommendation on this proposal submitted to Council

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

Since 2004, community volunteers from Dunsborough Coast and Land Care Inc (D-CALC), in partnership with Western Whale Research, have been using Point Picquet during the whale migration season as the vantage point for monitoring the whales’ southwards passage through Geographe Bay.

 

Point Picquet is considered to be the best site for whale monitoring as it is the northern projection of the “greater Castle Bay” area with deeper water close to the coast and provides an almost 180-degree view for monitoring passing whales. This site also provides a ready reference point for whale monitoring, which is the buoy of the Swan wreck dive, north-east of the site.

 

The concept design for the Whale viewing platform due to its low key design and setting into an existing depression in the coastal granite will have low visual impact due to the higher elevation of the surrounding landform.

 

The materials proposed for construction of the platform include exposed aggregate concrete and locally sourced granite. The use of exposed aggregate concrete is consistent with the material palette in the Meelup Beach Master Plan, and will also allow an organically-shaped structure that fits into the landscape, rather than a rectangular-shaped deck. Locally sourced granite will help blend the structure into the landscape and will continue the granite theme used elsewhere in the park and seating will be incorporated as part of the granite stone surround to the concrete platform.  The proposed platform will provide universal access for disabled and a compass will be embedded into the concrete platform, to assist orientation for the public whilst providing a useful function for whale watching monitors.

 

There are limited formalised lookouts elsewhere in the park; these include a timber deck at the termination of the universal trail alongside Meelup Brook, and a lookout car park on Meelup Beach Road. The proposed lookout at Point Picquet is unique in that it will be the only such infrastructure on the coastline in Meelup Regional Park, which will also provide universal access and has an almost 180-degree view of Geographe Bay.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Point Picquet has been used for the purpose of monitoring Whale migration since 2004 due to its proximity to deeper water close to the coast and almost 180-degree view for monitoring passing whales. Given that Point Picquet is currently the preferred location for Whale monitoring activities and that the development of Whale viewing platform will have low visual impact, it is recommend that the proposed concept design and construction drawings be advertised for public comment.

 

OPTIONS

 

The Committee may resolve not to accept the recommendation or may resolve to amend the Officer’s Recommendations. The Committee may also consider a review of other sites for the establishment of a whale viewing platform.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

Subject to the Committee supporting the Officer Recommendation, the proposed timeline for implementation of a public consultation period is 21 August 2015.

 

Council Decision / Committee Recommendation and Officer Recommendation

C1508/215              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council endorses the proposed concept design and construction drawings (Attachment B) for the establishment of a Whale viewing platform at Point Picquet for the purpose of public consultation and that the design and drawings be advertised for a  period of four weeks .

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      13                                                                 12 August 2015

10.2           Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ADOPTION OF POLICIES FOR BUSH FIRE BRIGADES

SUBJECT INDEX:

Bush Fire and Emergency Services

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

An organisation that is managed effectively and achieves positive outcomes for the community.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Environmental Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Ranger and Emergency Services

REPORTING OFFICER:

Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator - Dean Freeman

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Planning and Development Services - Paul Needham

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Nil

 

This item was considered by the Policy and Legislation Committee at its meeting on 30 July 2015, the recommendations from which have been included in this report. 

 

PRÉCIS

 

This report presents a series of draft policies for consideration which will act as guidelines for the conduct of City of Busselton Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades and their members.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

At the meeting of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee (BFAC) held on 10 December 2013 the Committee considered the matter of the conduct of brigade business and the standards of behaviour and qualification that were required of brigade members. Arising from this, the Committee resolved to form a working party as follows:

 

1.            a working party comprising the Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator, a representative of DFES Lower South West, the Chief Bush Fire Control Officer and three brigade representatives be formed to prepare a draft City of Busselton Bush Fire Brigades Local Law for consideration at the next meeting of this Committee.

 

2.            the following persons be appointed as brigade representatives on the working party:

 

a) D. Hunt – Yallingup Rural Bush Fire Brigade

 

b) B. Hatherly – Dunsborough Bush Fire Brigade

 

c) M. Fisher – Yallingup Rural Bush Fire Brigade

 

The working party met and the policies presented represent the culmination of the discussions held having regard for the outcomes being sought.

 

The policies were then considered by the BFAC at its meeting on 16th June 2015 and the draft policies as contained in the recommendation reflect the culmination of all discussions.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

Section 62 of the Bush Fires Act 1954 - Local Government may make local laws provides

(1) A local government may make local laws in accordance with subdivision 2 of Division 2 of Part 3 of the Local Government Act 1995 for and in relation to —

(a) the appointment, employment, payment, dismissal and duties of bush fire control officers; and

(b) the organisation, establishment, maintenance and equipment with appliances and apparatus of bush fire brigades to be established and maintained by the local government; and

(c) any other matters affecting the exercise of any powers or authorities conferred and the performance of any duties imposed upon the local government by this Act.

 

While this matter is not proposing the adoption of a Local Law, it can be seen that the adoption of Policies contained within the Officer Recommendation is consistent with the above provisions to provide for the organisation of Bush Fire brigades.

 

The City’s Bush Fire Advisory Committee is appointed in accordance with Section 67(1) of the Bush Fires Act 1954, to provide advice to Council regarding all matters relating to the preventing, controlling and extinguishing of bush fires, the planning of the layout of fire‐breaks in the district,  the formation of bush fire brigades and the grouping thereof under group brigade officers, the ensuring of co‐operation and co‐ordination of bush fire brigades in their efforts and activities, and various other matters relating to bush fire control.

 

Again, the adoption of the Policies as contained within the Officer Recommendation is considered consistent with the tenor of “ensuring of co‐operation and co‐ordination of bush fire brigades in their efforts and activities” of Section 67 of the Bush Fires Act 1954.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The City’s Bush Fire Strategic Plan was adopted in 2005 and is the overarching plan for the City’s management of bush fire issues.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There are no direct financial implications associated with the adoption of these policies.

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Nil.

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

Consideration of this matter is consistent with Community Objective 6.3 - An organisation that is managed effectively and achieves positive outcomes for the community – of the City of Busselton Strategic Community Plan 2013.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

The possible risk to the City of Busselton associated with the proposed adoption of policies for the operation and management of Volunteer Bush Fire brigades has been assessed in accordance with the following matrix. This identifies the likely risk level to the City following the adoption of the draft policies.

 

Risk

Controls

Consequence

Likelihood

Risk Level

There is a risk to the reputation of the City and its Bush Fire Brigades should any of the brigades be seen to be dysfunctional in their management or operations.

Adoption of policies as guidelines for the brigades

Minor

Unlikely

Low 5

CONSULTATION

 

There has been no external consultation in the development of these policies. The policies have been based on the discussions of the working group, consideration by the BFAC and using existing Bush Fire Brigade Local Laws which have been adopted by other Local Governments.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

The adoption of policies as guides for the day to day activities of brigades has been considered as being preferable to the adoption of local laws.

 

This position is based upon the flexibility of amending policies compared to an extensive statutory requirement to amend a local law. It was also considered whether there was the need to have the force of law that comes with adoption of a local law. That is, would it ever be considered that the City would want to prosecute a brigade or individual members for failing to comply with the local law?

 

CONCLUSION

 

Having regard for the concerns of the Committee when this matter was originally considered, it is considered that the draft policies as presented will give the Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades the necessary guidance, standards and processes to deal with management issues which are likely to arise.

 

The Officer Recommendation to this report represents the Bush Fire Advisory Committee recommendation to Council with one slight amendment.

 

The recommendation of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee is for Council to “note these policies as supporting the management of Bush Fire brigades. It is considered that these Policies should be adopted as Policies of Council having regard for the role of a local government in the organisation of Bush Fire brigades as intended under Section 62 of the Bush Fires Act.

 

The recommendation of policies relating to the organisation of brigades is also consistent with the role of a Bush Fire Advisory Committee under the Bush Fires Act 1954.

 

The adoption of the Policies, rather than noting them, will give these policies the backing of the Council and also ensure that they are not amended other than by Council.

 

OPTIONS

 

The Committee may elect not to support the draft policies as recommended however this will then result in no guidelines being available to assist brigades in their activities. This could then lead to differing standards within brigades across all areas covered by the proposed policies.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

These policies will come into effect once adopted by the Council.

 

 


 

OFFICER  & BFAC RECOMMENDATION

 

That in accordance with the Bush Fires Act 1954, the Council adopts the following policies for the management of Bush Fire Brigades:

 

Policy Grievance Process and Disciplinary Action

 

 

Policy Grievance Process and Disciplinary Action

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish an environment where members of Volunteer Bush Fire brigades of the City of Busselton can expect to be treated equally and with respect.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall operate in a manner that affords respect to all brigade members and provides for a fair process for dealing with grievances within the brigade.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1. Grievance Process / Disciplinary Action

(1) All Brigades, through their management and members shall commit to providing an environment in which all persons can expect to be treated equally and with respect.

 

(2) All members upon joining a brigade shall be provided with a copy of this Policy as part of their induction into the brigade.

 

(3) A grievance is any serious allegation, dispute or claim, arising during any training or activity involving the brigade, in relation to an act committed by a member. Examples that may be considered a grievance include acts that—

(a) constitute a breach of the Rules that may be from time to time be formed by a brigade,

(b) contravene the values of the Rules or the Code of Conduct Policy,

(c) bring the brigade, the City of Busselton Volunteer Bush Fire Service, and or the City of Busselton into disrepute;

(d) contravenes any reasonable direction given by the brigade’s Fire Control Officer, Captain or the delegated authority of the committee of the Brigade;

(e)shows disregard for brigade regulations, City of Busselton policies or procedures;

(f) jeopardises the safety of the member or others; and/or

(g) results in the member being convicted of an offence for which an offender may be imprisoned.

 

(4) Where a grievance arises, an investigation must be conducted by the Chairman (and the CBFCO if necessary) of the Brigade.

 

(5) During the investigation it may be determined that the member be suspended from all or part of brigade activities, subject to the CBFCO’s approval. If a member is to be suspended during the investigation the CBFCO shall notify the member in writing or email of the terms of the suspension, including the reason for the suspension and the time period. The time period for suspension during an investigation, should not exceed three (3) consecutive months.

 

When an investigation is completed a report will be provided by the investigating officer to the CBFCO outlining the process of the investigation, the conclusions drawn and any recommended action.

 

(6) Disciplinary action in relation to the member may include—

(a) suspension of membership;

(b) termination of membership; or

(c) any other reasonable disciplinary action as determined by the Brigade Executive Committee in consultation with the CBFCO.

 

(7) If a disciplinary suspension is imposed, the CBFCO must notify the member in writing or email that they are suspended, including the suspension period and reason for suspension. Suspension may be from complete or specific brigade duties and activities.

 

(8) The period of disciplinary suspension shall be determined by the CBFCO in consultation with the Chairman and the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(9) On completion of the suspension period the member may be required to undertake refresher training before resuming active fire fighting duties which will be supervised and or acknowledged by the Captain.

 

(10) If a membership is to be terminated, the Chairman with the approval of the CBFCO will notify the member in writing or email, and provide a reason for termination.

 

(11) Where a membership is terminated, all property owned by the local government shall be returned to the local government within fourteen (14) days of giving notice. Failure to meet these conditions may require the local government to seek reimbursement of costs against the member.

 

2 Termination by the Member

(1) A member can decide to resign from brigade activities and terminate their membership by providing written notification to the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(2) Where a member resigns, all property owned by the local government shall be returned to the local government within fourteen (14) days of giving notice. Failure to meet these conditions may result in the local government to seeking reimbursement of costs against the member.

 

3 Rights of a Volunteer Member

(1) A member shall not be suspended or dismissed from any brigade duty without an opportunity to defend the allegation.

 

(2) Any member may lodge a written objection to the CBFCO should they consider they have been unfairly dealt with by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(3) The CBFCO shall consider the objection and deal with it in consultation with the Brigade Executive Committee. This may include either—

(a) dismissing the objection;

(b) varying the decision;

(c) revoking the original decision;

(i) imposing an independent decision; or

(ii) referring the matter back to the Brigade Executive Committee to reconsider the decision.

 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Meetings of the Brigade

 

08

Policy Meetings of the Brigade

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to provide a structure for the conduct of meetings of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades to assist the operation of the Brigade and any Committee that the brigade may establish.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, meetings of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall be held in a manner that is open to respected principles of inclusion and accountability.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

 

Part 1 -Meetings of the Brigade

1 Ordinary meetings

(1) The brigade may at any time call an Ordinary Meeting of its members.

 

(2) The brigade shall hold a minimum of one (1) Ordinary Meeting between 1 July and 30 June each year or as they deem necessary.

 

(3) A quorum for an Ordinary Meeting shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

2 Annual General Meeting (AGM)

(1) The brigade shall hold an AGM in the month of May each calendar year.

 

(2) A quorum for the AGM shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

(3) A report may be presented to the membership by a Brigade Executive Committee Office Bearer

 

(4) At this meeting all Brigade Executive Committee and Brigade Officer positions will be declared vacant.

 

(5) All equipment and documentation relevant to each position is to be made available for auditing at the AGM.

 

(6) The Chairman or proxy will act as returning officer during the election of the new Brigade Executive Committee and brigade officer positions.

 

(7) The incoming Brigade Executive Committee will assume the positions at the close of the AGM.

 

(8) Any outgoing Brigade Executive Committee Member is to conduct a handover to the new incumbent.

 

(9) All minutes of the AGM including financial statements are to be lodged with Executive Officer of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee for the information of the local government within a period no later than twenty-one (21) days after the AGM.

 

3 Special Meeting

(1) The Chairman may at any time convene a special meeting of the brigade.

 

(2) The Secretary of the brigade must convene a special meeting when a written request is made by not less than ten (10) or fifty (50) percent (whichever is least) active members of the brigade?

 

(3) The names of the members requesting the special meeting are to be recorded in the notice of meeting submitted to members and the minutes of the meeting.

 

(4) A quorum for a Special Meeting shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

4 Notice of a Meeting

(1) Notice of any Special Meeting of the brigade, must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote at least seventy two (72) hours before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(2) Notice of the AGM of the brigade must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote, as well as the CBFCO, at least thirty (30) days before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(3) Notice of any Ordinary Meeting of the brigade must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote, as well as the CBFCO, at least seven (7) days before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(4) Notice of an Ordinary Meeting, Special Meeting or AGM—

(a) must be given by the Secretary;

(b) may be given by written notice to each member—

(i) Personally, by post or electronic email; or

(ii) By a notice published in a newspaper circulating in the area of the brigade;

(c) must set out the date, time, and venue of the meeting;

(d) must be signed by the Secretary or, in the case of a special meeting, by the person convening the meeting; and

(e) must set out an agenda for the meeting.

 

5 Quorum

No formal business is to be transacted at a meeting of the brigade unless a quorum of members is present.

 

 

6 Voting

(1) Each Active and Auxiliary Member shall be entitled to one (1) vote.

 

 (2) In the event of an equality of votes, the Chairman may exercise the deciding vote.

 

(3) Votes may be counted by either—

(a) formal secret ballot; or

(b) informal show of hands.

 

(4) The form of voting in (3) above shall be determined by a simple majority of members present at the meeting.

 

(5) A member is not deemed to be active and is unable to cast a vote at any meeting of the brigade, unless all requirements in regards to brigade training and activities as set out under section 4.7 have been satisfied.

 

7 Procedure at Meetings

Meeting procedures and protocols are to be in accordance with the brigade’s meeting procedures and protocol guidelines.

 

Part 2—Committee

1 Meetings

(1) Each brigade shall have a Brigade Executive Committee. The Brigade Executive Committee shall meet each calendar month or as required.

 

(2) Any functions of the brigade may be delegated to the Brigade Executive Committee provided that a motion approving of the delegation has been carried at either an Ordinary Meeting or AGM.

 

(3) The Brigade Executive Committee shall consist of the following Office Bearers—

(a) Chairman

(b) Secretary

(c) Treasurer

(d) FCO's

(e) Captain

(f) Other Office Bearers

(g) A Bush Fire Ready Coordinator Representative where this organisation exists and the representative is a member of the Brigade.

 

(4) The Brigade Executive Committee will be responsible for the management and administration of the brigade. The brigade officers are responsible for all operational requirements of the brigade.

 

(5) A motion carried by the vote of a majority of those present at a Brigade Executive Committee meeting shall be accepted as the decision of the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(6) Each Brigade Executive Committee Member present at a meeting of the Brigade Executive Committee shall be entitled to one (1) vote. In the event of an equality of votes the Chairman will be entitled to a second or casting vote.

 

(7) The Secretary must keep accurate minutes of the meeting

 

(8) Minutes of these meetings shall be made available to members of the brigade.

 

(9) The term of all elected positions on the Brigade Executive Committee shall expire at the completion of the next AGM of the brigade.

 

Part 3—Brigade Elections

1 Nomination of Candidates for Brigade Elections

(1) Any person accepting a nomination for a Brigade Executive Committee position must be competent and qualified to perform the duties and responsibilities of that position.

 

(2) The Secretary shall advise the Chairman of the brigade at the general meeting prior to the AGM that nominations are required to be presented at the AGM.

 

(3) A person can only be nominated by an Active Member.

 

(4) A nomination must be endorsed by a second Active Member filling out a Nomination Form in the form of Schedule 1 attached.

 

(5) Each member is only entitled to nominate one (1) person per position.

 

(6) A nomination may be made—

(a) in writing or email to be received by the Chairman before the official close of nominations; or

(b) verbally at a general meeting prior to the AGM.

 

(7) Nominees must sign or indicate acceptance of nomination.

 

(8) Nominees for operational Brigade Officer positions must meet the minimum requirements for training as set out under section 3 of these Rules.

 

(9) Nominees for Brigade Officer positions must accept all requirements imposed by the Local Government, the brigade or legislation.

 

(10) The Brigade Executive Committee will assist and mentor new Brigade Officers in their new roles.

 

(11) The CBFCO or a proxy may act in the position as returning officer during the election of office bearers at the AGM if requested by the brigade.

 

2 Conduct of Elections

(1) Positions shall be determined by vote in accordance with the following order:

 

Order

Officer

Term

1

Chairman

1 year

2

Secretary

1 year

3

Treasurer

1 year

4

FCO Nominations

1 year

5

Captain

1 year

6

Lieutenants

1 year

7

Training Officer

1 year

8

Equipment Officer

1 year

9

Other

1 year

 

(2) Any additional positions to the Brigade Executive Committee or the Brigade are to be elected in accordance with Brigade standard meeting procedures.

 

(3) Any appointment to the office of Bush Fire Control Officer shall not have effect until the nomination has been considered by the Bush Fire Advisory Committee and the appointment has been approved by the local government.

 

3 Absentee Votes

(1) Where a member of the Brigade or the Brigade Executive Committee is not able to be present to cast their vote in person, that member may cast an absent vote.

 

(2) An absent vote shall be cast by the member in writing or email and be received by the brigade secretary prior to the voting on any matter before the meeting.

 

(3) The absent vote shall contain the name of the person casting the vote and some verification of authenticity of the vote (ie signature or email address if voting by email).

 

7.4 Supplementary Elections

Where a supplementary election must be held due to a vacancy in a position as a result of an early resignation or other reason, the Brigade Executive Committee, by majority vote, will appoint a consenting Active Member for the remaining term of the vacant position.

 


 

Schedule 1

NOMINATION FORM

(Part 3 – Brigade Elections - Clause 1(4))

(Name of Brigade) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade

 

I……………………………………….……………………………………………………as an active member of the ………………………………………Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade hereby nominate for the position of (please tick √)–

 

Fire Control Officers

Lieutenant

Captain

Chairman

Secretary

Treasurer

Training Officer

Equipment/Comms Officer

First Aid Officer

Station/Callout Attendant

 

(If nominating for more than one position, separate forms are required)

 

I ............................................................................................................................... as an active member of …………………………………….............. Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade hereby endorse the above nomination.

 

 

Signed _____________________________ Date ____________________

 

Full name of Nominee: ................................................................................................................................. .

Address: .....................................................................................................................................................

Contact Details—

Home: …………………………………………..

Mobile: …………………………………………..

E-mail: …………………………………………..

DFES Identification Number: ………………….

I certify that I have read and understand the duties and responsibilities for the position I have been nominated as specified under the Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Rules and that I have currency in all the competencies required. I understand that if I do not have currency in all the competencies required I can still be nominated subject to the approval of the CBFCO. Such approval may be conditional on further training or other arrangements as deemed necessary.

 

_________________________                  ______________________

Signature                                                             Date

Received by Secretary/Returning Officer—

 

____________________________           _____________

Signature                                                             Date

 


 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Membership

 

08

Policy Membership

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish the classifications of membership within Bush Fire brigades of the City of Busselton and provide for the integration of new members into the brigade.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, persons seeking to become members of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall have an understanding of the commitment expected of a brigade member so that they may contribute in a manner that enhances their experience and value as a member of the brigade.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1 New Membership Application

(1) A new member is to complete a DFES volunteer nomination form and accept the conditions for membership.

 

(2) A minimum of two (2) Brigade Executive Committee members, including the Captain, should decide whether to recommend the application to the Senior FCO.

 

(3) At the meeting of the Committee, the brigade Office Bearers may-

(a) Accept Application

(b) Defer the Application for further consideration or:

(c) Refer the application to the Senior FCO for consideration

 

2 Dual Membership

(1) A member may be a member of another local government brigade.

 

(2) A member may not be a member of another brigade within the local government unless they have the written permission of the Senior FCO’s of the brigades concerned. This permission may be conditional.

 

3 Categories of Membership

The categories of membership shall be—

(a) Fire Fighters;

(b) Management Support;

(c) Auxiliary Members;

(d) Cadets, and

(e) Associates.

 

4 Training

(1) A new member is required to complete the necessary Fire Fighter Training Courses as required by the local government prior to commencing active and unsupervised Fire Fighter duties.

 

(2) Competency in these Training Courses shall be the minimum acceptable standard required for a Fire Fighter to perform active and unsupervised fire fighting duties. Currently this includes Induction, Introduction to Fire Fighting and Bush Fire Fighting training Courses.

 

(3) Members must comply with the legislative requirements of the—

(a) Bush Fires Act 1954 (WA);

(b) FESA Act 1998 (WA); and

(c) Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA).

 

(4) Members must act within the—

(a) Local guidelines;

(b) Brigade’s local policies;

(c) Code of Conduct Policy,

(d) Competency and commitment requirements for an active volunteer Fire Fighter or Operation and Management Support roles as required by the CBFCO; and

(e) Westplan Bushfire.

 

(5) Members must maintain currency of the appropriate licenses to be able to operate brigade vehicles. Any traffic offence that results in a suspension or loss of license must be reported to the Captain, the FCO and CBFCO and the member must comply with the terms of their suspension.

 

5 Decision on Application Membership

(1) The Chairman of the brigade must contact the applicant in writing or email within fourteen (14) days of a final decision by the brigade or the CBFCO.

 

(2) The applicant has the right to appeal the decision of the Brigade Executive Committee. The appeal shall be in writing or email addressed to the Senior FCO and Chairman.

 

6 Induction

All new members shall be—

(a) introduced to brigade members and shown all brigade facilities during induction;

(b) instructed about any safety requirements;

(c) made aware of brigade duties and responsibilities;

(d) provided with a mentor/s until such time as they are familiar with Normal Brigade Activities;

(e) provided with a copy of the Code of Conduct Policy, and

(f) made aware of City of Busselton and local brigade guidelines and policies if any exist within that brigade.

 

7 Membership Requirements (Brigade Commitments)

(1) Members are required to maintain currency in brigade activities and training to be deemed as an Active Member and or be granted special considerations due to extenuating circumstances.

 

(2) Brigade Activities—

(a) During the Fire Season members are required to attend a minimum of one (1) brigade ordinary meeting or other brigade activity or incident.

(b) During the Non-Fire Season members are required to attend a minimum of one (1) brigade ordinary meeting or other brigade activity or incident.

 

(3) Brigade Training—

(a) During the Fire Season members are required to attend and participate at a minimum of one (1) brigade training activity or incident.

(b) During the Non-Fire Season members are required to attend and participate at a minimum of one (1) brigade training activity or incident.

 

(4) If extenuating circumstances apply that a member is unable to meet brigade commitments, it shall be the responsibility of the member to notify the Brigade Executive Committee, in writing or email to advise of the circumstance, and the Brigade Executive Committee will acknowledge in writing or email any special considerations to the member.

 

(5) The Training Officer should endeavour to make alternative arrangements for the member to meet the requirements wherever possible.

 

8 Failure to Comply with Commitments

(1) Should an active member of a brigade fail to comply with section 7, correspondence will be forwarded to the member requesting contact be made with the brigade to indicate the intentions of the member’s status.

 

(2) The Brigade Member may—

(a) respond to the correspondence providing a reasonable explanation and request for alternative arrangements to be made for training or meeting obligations.

(b) request in writing or email for Leave of Absence from brigade commitments due to personal circumstances.

(c) terminate their membership.

 

(3) If a member fails to respond to the correspondence Under section 8 within fourteen (14) days a subsequent letter will be forwarded putting the member on final notice. Should a member fail to acknowledge the final notice within fourteen (14) days, the membership shall be terminated, to take effect from the date of the final notice.

 

9 Change of Members Details

The local government and DFES are to be notified of any change of personal details of a member. The brigade will complete a DFES volunteer application form and forward it to the Local Government representative and DFES within fourteen (14) days of the change.

 

 

10 Leave of Absence

(1) A member may at any time request a Leave of Absence from all brigade commitments for a period not to exceed twelve (12) consecutive months.

 

(2) The application should be made in writing or email and addressed to the Captain. Copy to Brigade FCO’s.

 

(3) On completion of the Leave of Absence period the member must complete a Membership Update Form if deemed necessary providing any change of details and forward to the Captain and FCO’s.

 

(4) On completion of the Leave of Absence period the member must undertake any refresher training required before resuming active fire fighting duties. If the request for Leave of Absence is for a medical condition the member must provide confirmation of fitness to the satisfaction of the CBFCO to be able to resume active duties.


 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency -

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

Policy Qualifications of Brigade Officers

 

08

Policy Qualifications of Brigade Officers

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to establish the qualifications required of persons seeking to hold office within Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton; either in an operational or administrative capacity.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, member of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall be informed in advance of required training and qualifications required of Brigade Officers. This will enable members aspiring to become brigade Officers to plan a training pathway to obtain the necessary qualifications.

 

This Policy will also serve to provide direction to the brigade Training Officer on appropriate training that will support a member’s brigade aspirations.

 

 

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

Duties and Responsibilities of Brigade Office Bearers

The Office Bearers of the brigade should be able to demonstrate current competencies for the position of office they are nominated for, or give an undertaking to complete any training requirements prior to accepting the nomination or undertaking the duties and responsibilities of the said position.

 

Nominations are subject to the approval of the Senior FCO. Such approval may be conditional on the nominee undertaking further training or other necessary arrangements to satisfy the competency requirements.

 

The following are to be adopted as guidelines and where competencies names may vary from time to time the member may have an alternative appropriate competency.

 

1 Captain

(1) The Captain of the brigade shall be responsible for the leadership and management of brigade operations in liaison with Fire Control Officers.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Captain of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting and/or support experience

Minimum 3 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

Structural Fire fighting

 

Competent

AIIMS Awareness

 

Competent

 

2 Fire Control Officer (FCO)

(1) A FCO is a delegated representative of the local government responsible for the administration of provisions within the Act. The position is required to perform active operational duties in relation to both fire defence and fire prevention strategies within the local community.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Fire Control Office of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting experience

Minimum 4 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

Structural Fire fighting

 

Competent

AIIMS Awareness

 

Competent

Fire Control Officer

 

Competent

 

3 Lieutenant

(1) The Lieutenant of a brigade is responsible for the operational management of members during brigade activities. The position is required to provide operational support to the Captain in managing the brigade. The position reports to the Captain on all matters relevant to the functioning of the Brigade and/or personnel they are supervising.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Lieutenant of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting experience

Minimum 3 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

 

4 Fire Fighter

A Fire Fighter is an active member of the brigade who, when engaging in Brigade operational matters shall act in accordance with the instructions of senior brigade officers.

 

A member shall be a competent fire fighter before being engaged on wildfire suppression duties.

 

The minimum qualifications for a person to be considered competent are as follows:

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

 

5 Chairman

The Chairman of the Brigade is elected to preside over all brigade meetings and promote open fair discussion during debate in relation to brigade matters.

 

The occupant of the position of Chairman is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The Chairman must have:

(a) Sound understanding of meeting procedures; and

(b) Demonstrated ability to conduct and manage meetings.

 

6 Secretary

The Secretary is to record and manage administrational matters of the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The occupant of the position of Secretary must have:

(a) Demonstrated ability to take minutes;

(b) Demonstrated record keeping and filing skills;

(c) An understanding of meeting procedure; and

(d) Developing computer skills.

 

7 Treasurer

The role of the Treasurer is to manage and report on all financial matters relevant to the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The occupant of the position of Treasurer must have:

(a) Knowledge and understanding of accounting principles; and

(b) Developing computer skills.

 

8 Brigade Training Officer

(1) The Brigade Training Officer is responsible for the management and co-ordination of brigade training in conjunction with the Local Government Training Coordinator, including the documentation of these activities. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2) Duties and Responsibilities of the Brigade Training Officer may include—

(a) Ensure brigade members maintain necessary skill levels equivalent to the competency standards required by the local government and as recommended by DFES;

(b) Endeavour to ensure regular training sessions are conducted within the brigade to maintain currency of qualifications and skills;

(c) Maintain accurate records of training undertaken by members and ensure that qualification and training updates are forwarded to the Local Government Training Coordinator as required;

(d) Provide mentoring for members who express an interest in training to encourage future facilitators.

(e) Liaise with Captain and FCO's on training operations

 

9 Brigade Equipment Officer

The Brigade Equipment Officer is not required to perform active operational duties but needs to be able to demonstrate a degree of knowledge of brigade equipment.

 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy - Roles of Brigade Officers

 

08

Draft Policy Roles of Brigade Officers

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to establish the roles of persons appointed as officers of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, officers of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton, shall have a clear understanding of the extent of their authority and how their role will contribute to the strong management and operations of the brigade.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

Roles and Responsibilities of Brigade Office Bearers

 

Office bearers of a brigade shall perform the following roles:

 

1 Captain

(1) The Captain of the brigade shall be responsible for the leadership and management of brigade operations in liaison with Fire Control Officers.

 

(2) As a role model and mentor for members, the Captain should always act with integrity and consider each member equally. All decisions should be in the interest of the Brigade and its members.

 

(3) The position reports to the FCO's and the CBFCO on brigade related matters.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of the Captain include—

(a) Demonstrate positive leadership and mentor members;

(b) If the Captain is the senior officer at an incident;

(i) command, control and confidently manage activities at emergency incidents

(ii) to ensure incident control systems and management principles are implemented and maintained during all emergency incidents if required;

(iii) maintain some form of personal incident diary with a record of events and decisions that occur at an incident;

(iv) conduct Brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting, incident support or management issues;

(v) ensure members deployed for operational duties have the competencies to complete the task or duty assigned and hold currency in training to carry out the functions required, in accordance with training recommendations;

(vi) to undertake responsibility for the proper management and maintenance of Brigade property and equipment to the best of their ability;

(vii) ensure conduct of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct, and

(viii) report any injuries of personnel or damage to fire fighting vehicles or equipment immediately to the FCO and the CBFCO.

 

(5) In the absence of the Captain, the next senior officer of the brigade has authority to exercise the powers of the Act delegated to the Captain (Part IV Section 44(1)).

 

2 Fire Control Officer (FCO)

(1) A FCO is a delegated representative of the local government responsible for the administration of provisions within the Act. The position is required to perform active operational duties in relation to both fire defence and fire prevention strategies within the local community.

 

(2) A member of the Brigade may be nominated for this position at the Brigade AGM.

 

(3) Fire Control Officers are nominated by the brigade to the Bush Fire Advisory Committee. The nomination is considered by BFAC and the CBFCO and if appropriate it is forwarded to the local government for its consideration and ratification.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of the FCO include—

(a) authorise permits for hazard reduction burns within the local government in accordance with the Act;

(b) identify and conduct risk assessments of fire hazards within the local government;

(c) perform duties prescribed by the Act and authorised by the local government;

(d) may take overall control of fire suppression activities or operational incidents where the local government is the Controlling Agency;

(e) maintain a personal incident diary to include a record of events and decisions during an incident;

(f) conduct brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting or management issues.

(g) Provide advice and guidance and assist in Brigade management to effect improvements to fire management in the area.

(h) carry out normal brigade activities

(i) ensure conduct of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct.

 

3 Lieutenant

(1) The Lieutenant of a brigade is responsible for the operational management of members during brigade activities. The position is required to provide operational support to the Captain in managing the brigade. The position reports to the Captain on all matters relevant to the functioning of the Brigade and/or personnel they are supervising.

 

(2) The Brigade should appoint a minimum of two (2) Lieutenants. Additional Lieutenants may be appointed according to the needs of the Brigade. If operational circumstances require the number of Lieutenants for a brigade to be more than four (4), as decided by the Brigade Executive Committee, a request is to be submitted in writing or email to the CBFCO for endorsement.

 

(3) The brigade must rank all Lieutenants numerically according to seniority including length of service and relevant skills.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of a Lieutenant include—

(a) provide support to the Captain and assist with the operational management of the brigade;

(b) in the absence of the Captain administer all powers and responsibilities of the Act (Part IV Section 44(1));

(c) command and manage members during emergencies and other brigade related incidents and activities;

(d) maintain a personal incident diary with a record of events that occur during all incidents if assuming the role of the most Senior Officer;

(e) in the absence of a more Senior Officer, conduct brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting or management issues;

(f) encourage positive interaction and teamwork between members;

(g) ensure Bush Fire Operating Procedures are adhered to at brigade activities;

(h) to endeavour to ensure active members engaged in brigade activities are allocated tasks relevant to their competencies;

(i) work cohesively with the Brigade Training Officer to conduct training activities for active members;

(j) to ensure the behaviour of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct.

 

3.4 Chairman

(1) The Chairman of the Brigade shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting of the Brigade, or a Special Meeting of the Brigade held for that purpose.

 

(2) The Chairman shall be elected by a majority of the members present at the meeting, subject to sufficient members of the meeting being present to constitute a quorum.

 

(3) The occupant of the position of Chairman is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

(4) The position reports to the Captain and FCO's on administrative matters pertinent to the brigade. In the absence of the Chairman, the members of the Brigade present shall elect one of the members present to deputise as Chairman for the duration of that meeting.

 

(5) The Chairman shall perform the following functions—

(a) preside over all brigade meetings;

(b) ensure meeting procedure and protocol is maintained;

(c) promote the aims and objectives of the brigade where possible;

(d) advise the brigade on administrative matters;

(e) report brigade matters to the Captain and FCO's;

(f) promote open fair discussion during debate in relation to brigade matters; and

(g) ensure minutes of meetings are signed and dated by the Chairman.

 

5 Secretary

(1) The Secretary is to record and manage administrational matters of the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

(2) The position reports to the Chairman on administration matters relevant to the brigade. This position may be held in conjunction with the Treasurer position.

 

(3) The Secretary shall perform the following functions—

(a) Ensure members receive notification of brigade meetings in accordance with Council Policy – Meetings of Brigades,

(b) Where deemed appropriate, prepare an agenda for brigade meetings and distribute to members prior to meetings;

(c) Ensure minutes of brigade meetings are recorded and where ever possible, distributed to all members prior to next meeting;

(d) Document and record all brigade correspondence;

(e) Ensure brigade information is disseminated to all listed members;

(f) Make available circulars and other information to members;

(g) Work cohesively with local government management and administration staff on matters relevant to brigade administration.

(h) Maintain a register of Brigade Members

 

6 Treasurer

(1) The role of the Treasurer is to manage and report on all financial matters relevant to the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2)The position reports to the Chairman on financial matters relevant to the brigade. This position may be held in conjunction with the Secretary position.

 

(3) The Treasurer shall perform the following functions—

(a) Manage financial affairs including budgets of the brigade;

(b) Maintain brigade financial records and provide detailed reports of income and expenditure at meetings;

(c) Work cohesively with the City of Busselton on matters pertinent to brigade financial matters, including providing copies of financial statements when requested.

 

 

7 Brigade Training Officer

(1) The Brigade Training Officer is responsible for the management and co-ordination of brigade training in conjunction with the Local Government Training Coordinator, including the documentation of these activities. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

The Office is expected to maintain a sound knowledge of the Competencies required by members.

 

(2) Duties and Responsibilities of the Brigade Training Officer may include—

(a) Ensure brigade members maintain necessary skill levels equivalent to the competency standards required by the local government and as recommended by DFES;

(b) Endeavour to ensure regular training sessions are conducted within the brigade to maintain currency of qualifications and skills;

(c) Maintain accurate records of training undertaken by members and ensure that qualification and training updates are forwarded to the Local Government Training Coordinator as required;

(d) Provide mentoring for members who express an interest in training to encourage future facilitators.

(e) Liaise with Captain and FCO's on training operations.

 

8 Brigade Equipment Officer

(1) The role of the Brigade Equipment Officer is to manage brigade property, fleet vehicles, general equipment and stock levels of personal protective equipment. The position is not required to perform active operational duties but may be able to demonstrate a degree of knowledge of brigade equipment. The position may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2) The equipment officer shall perform the following functions—

(a) Manage brigade equipment and maintain a register of all assets;

(b) Coordinate and record maintenance of brigade equipment;

(c) Report all damage of brigade equipment or property to the FCO's and Captain immediately;

(d) Manage brigade requests for replacement items and equipment; and

(e) Compile documentation of replacement items and submit to the Captain and FCO's and CBFCO.

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy Brigade Accounting

 

08

Draft Policy Brigade Accounting

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that the financial affairs of Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton are conducted in a manner that will ensure accountability of community funds.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, the City of Busselton seeks to ensure that the financial affairs of volunteer bush fire brigades are managed in a manner that will ensure that brigade and community members can be satisfied that any funds held by the brigade are properly accounted for, and are used for the purposes for which they were raised.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1 Accounts at Financial Institutions

(1) The brigade must disclose where brigade account(s) are to be held for the ensuing Financial Year at each AGM and record this information within the minutes of the AGM.

 

(2) The brigade must have three (3) Brigade Executive Committee Members to act as signatories for the brigade accounts each Financial Year.

 

(3) A minimum of two (2) signatures is required on any brigade account cheque or bank transaction form.

 

(4) All brigade purchases are to be approved by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(5) All accounts raised, works undertaken or goods to be purchased by the brigade must be authorised in advance by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(6) All accounts raised, works undertaken or goods to be purchased need to be ratified by the brigade at the next Ordinary Meeting.

 

(7) All funds raised by the brigade are to be used for the purpose of improving the profile and operation of the brigade and its members.

 

(8) All payments issued must be accompanied by the appropriate documentation (invoice or monthly account).

 

(9) All money received by the brigade or by a member on behalf of the brigade must be recorded in the brigade financial records.

 

2 Financial Reports

(1)  The Treasurer must, at each AGM, present a financial report for the previous 12-month period or since the last AGM.

 

(2) The financial report must include—

(a) a Statement of Receipts and Payments;

(b) a Bank Reconciliation Statement;

(c) notes detailing any outstanding receipts or payments; and

(d) an Inventory of Assets held by the brigade.

 

3) The financial report will be forwarded to the Executive Officer of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee for the information of the local government

 

(4)The City shall have the option to re/view the financial statement of any brigade if it considers it is necessary, and may undertake an audit if required by the Chief Executive Officer

 

3 Rules for Deductible Gift Recipient Funds

(1) If a Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade establishes a Fire and Emergency Public Fund, the fund called the “(insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund” is to be governed by this policy.

(2) The object of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund is to solicit and receive gifts from the public solely for the purpose of supporting the volunteer-based emergency service activities of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade.

(3) The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade must maintain the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund as a ‘gift fund’ to receive and record all of the following:

a) gifts of money or property;

b) deductible contributions described in item 7 and 8 of the table in section 30-15 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 in relation to a fund-raising event held for that purpose;

c) money received because of such gifts and contributions.

 

(4) The public fund is not to receive any other money or property.

 

(5). All receipts for gifts must include all of the following:

a) be issued in the name of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund;

b) state that the receipt is for a gift;

c) state the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade’s ABN.

 

(6). The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade may invite the public to donate to the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund.

(7). A Brigade Executive Committee of management of no fewer than three persons will be appointed by the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade to administer the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund. A majority of the members of the Brigade Executive committee of management are required to be persons having a degree of responsibility to the general community by reason of their occupation or standing in the community.

(8) The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund (Fund) shall operate on a non-profit basis. No portion of the assets or income of the Fund will be distributed directly or indirectly to members of (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade or the Fund’s management Brigade Executive committee apart from bona fide compensation for services rendered or expenses incurred on behalf of the Fund.

(9) If the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund is wound up or if the endorsement of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade as a deductible gift recipient for the operation of the Fund is revoked, any surplus assets of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund remaining after the payment of liabilities attributable to it, shall be transferred to a fund, authority or institution which has similar objects and to which income tax deductible gifts can be made.

(10). (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade must notify the Australian Taxation Office in writing or email if it is no longer entitled to be endorsed for the operation of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund, or of any changes that would affect its entitlement to endorsement.

 

 

Policy Background

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History –

 

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy Code of Conduct Values and Objectives

 

08

Draft Policy – Code of Conduct, Brigade Objectives and Values

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish core values that underpin membership of, and the operations of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton, and the members of those brigades will conduct themselves in a manner that is worthy of the respect of the community in acknowledgement of their dedication to community values and safety.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1. Code of Conduct

The City of Busselton has established Volunteer Bush Fire brigades pursuant to the powers enabling the City contained in Section 41 of the Bush Fires Act 1954.

 

As members of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades established under the Act, members of the brigade are officers of the City and as such are expected at all times to conduct themselves in a manner that is

1.    consistent with the best interests of the brigade,

2.    is in line with the organisational chain of command for both fire fighting and brigade activities, and

3.    does not in any way bring discredit to either the brigade, it’s members or the City.

 

To this end, the City of Busselton has adopted the  Code of Conduct for Volunteer Bush Fire Fighters. Members of Brigades are required to commit to the standards of the Code and be governed by the Code.

 

Any person who is a member of a Brigade, when acting in that capacity shall:

Act with reasonable care and diligence;

Act with honesty and integrity;

Act lawfully;

Avoid damage to the reputation of the local government;

Be open and accountable;

Base decisions on relevant and factually correct information;

Treat others with respect and fairness;

Not be impaired by mind affecting substances.

Fulfil their public and professional duties in a manner that is ethical, impartial, objective and responsible;

Not use or attempt to use their positions for personal benefit or the personal benefit of others, either by influencing others, the improper use of information gained in the performance of their duties, or otherwise;

Understand and be mindful of their role, responsibilities, empowerment and limitations and act within those parameters

Refrain from making allegations which are improper or derogatory, unless true, in the public interest and in an appropriate forum;

Refrain from any form of conduct in the performance of their official or professional duties which may cause any reasonable person unwarranted offence or embarrassment.

 

2 Brigade Objectives

 

The Brigade shall undertake the following objectives—

(a) provide timely, efficient and effective emergency services;

(b) minimise the impact of emergencies on the community;

(c) work with the community to increase bush fire awareness and fire prevention;

(d) ensure that active Members’ training requirements are maintained and documented to meet City of Busselton and DFES standards

(e) ensure all operational equipment is serviceable and available for emergencies;

(f) provide an environment where every individual is treated with respect, and which is free from discrimination or harassment;

(g) uphold the City of Busselton’s Policy - Code of Conduct; brigade Objective and Values; and

(h) service the needs of the community and work cohesively with other agencies.

 

3 Brigade Values

 

(1) Members are to adopt the Brigade values at all times when representing the Brigade in accordance with the Code of Conduct as in Clause 3.

 

(2) The Brigade values include—

(a) Put the community first;

(b) Act with integrity and honesty;

(c) Work together as a committed team;

(d) Strive to keep ourselves and others safe;

(e) Respect and value the contribution of others;

(f) Have open and honest two way communication; and

(g) Continuously develop our skills to improve our service to the community.

 

Policy Reference No. – 015

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: The Committee made a minor change to the Grievance Process and Disciplinary Action Policy to clarify the process if a grievance involves a Chairman or CBFCO.

 

Council Decision and Committee Recommendation

C1508/216              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That in accordance with the Bush Fires Act 1954, the Council adopts the following policies for the management of Bush Fire Brigades:

 

Policy Grievance Process and Disciplinary Action

 

 

Policy Grievance Process and Disciplinary Action

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish an environment where members of Volunteer Bush Fire brigades of the City of Busselton can expect to be treated equally and with respect.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall operate in a manner that affords respect to all brigade members and provides for a fair process for dealing with grievances within the brigade.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1. Grievance Process / Disciplinary Action

(1) All Brigades, through their management and members shall commit to providing an environment in which all persons can expect to be treated equally and with respect.

 

(2) All members upon joining a brigade shall be provided with a copy of this Policy as part of their induction into the brigade.

 

(3) A grievance is any serious allegation, dispute or claim, arising during any training or activity involving the brigade, in relation to an act committed by a member. Examples that may be considered a grievance include acts that—

(a) constitute a breach of the Rules that may be from time to time be formed by a brigade,

(b) contravene the values of the Rules or the Code of Conduct Policy,

(c) bring the brigade, the City of Busselton Volunteer Bush Fire Service, and or the City of Busselton into disrepute;

(d) contravenes any reasonable direction given by the brigade’s Fire Control Officer, Captain or the delegated authority of the committee of the Brigade;

(e)shows disregard for brigade regulations, City of Busselton policies or procedures;

(f) jeopardises the safety of the member or others; and/or

(g) results in the member being convicted of an offence for which an offender may be imprisoned.

 

(4) Where a grievance arises, an investigation must be conducted by the Chairman of the Brigade and the CBFCO if necessary, or the CBFCO if the grievance involves the Chairman, or by the Chief Executive Officer or their nominee if the grievance involves the CBFCO.

 

(5) During the investigation it may be determined that the member be suspended from all or part of brigade activities, subject to the CBFCO’s approval. If a member is to be suspended during the investigation the CBFCO shall notify the member in writing or email of the terms of the suspension, including the reason for the suspension and the time period. The time period for suspension during an investigation, should not exceed three (3) consecutive months.

 

When an investigation is completed a report will be provided by the investigating officer to the CBFCO outlining the process of the investigation, the conclusions drawn and any recommended action.

 

(6) Disciplinary action in relation to the member may include—

(a) suspension of membership;

(b) termination of membership; or

(c) any other reasonable disciplinary action as determined by the Brigade Executive Committee in consultation with the CBFCO.

 

(7) If a disciplinary suspension is imposed, the CBFCO must notify the member in writing or email that they are suspended, including the suspension period and reason for suspension. Suspension may be from complete or specific brigade duties and activities.

 

(8) The period of disciplinary suspension shall be determined by the CBFCO in consultation with the Chairman and the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(9) On completion of the suspension period the member may be required to undertake refresher training before resuming active fire fighting duties which will be supervised and or acknowledged by the Captain.

 

(10) If a membership is to be terminated, the Chairman with the approval of the CBFCO will notify the member in writing or email, and provide a reason for termination.

 

(11) Where a membership is terminated, all property owned by the local government shall be returned to the local government within fourteen (14) days of giving notice. Failure to meet these conditions may require the local government to seek reimbursement of costs against the member.

 

2 Termination by the Member

(1) A member can decide to resign from brigade activities and terminate their membership by providing written notification to the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(2) Where a member resigns, all property owned by the local government shall be returned to the local government within fourteen (14) days of giving notice. Failure to meet these conditions may result in the local government to seeking reimbursement of costs against the member.

 

3 Rights of a Volunteer Member

(1) A member shall not be suspended or dismissed from any brigade duty without an opportunity to defend the allegation.

 

(2) Any member may lodge a written objection to the CBFCO should they consider they have been unfairly dealt with by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(3) The CBFCO shall consider the objection and deal with it in consultation with the Brigade Executive Committee. This may include either—

(a) dismissing the objection;

(b) varying the decision;

(c) revoking the original decision;

(i) imposing an independent decision; or

(ii) referring the matter back to the Brigade Executive Committee to reconsider the decision.

 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Meetings of the Brigade

 

08

Policy Meetings of the Brigade

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to provide a structure for the conduct of meetings of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades to assist the operation of the Brigade and any Committee that the brigade may establish.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, meetings of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall be held in a manner that is open to respected principles of inclusion and accountability.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

 

Part 1 -Meetings of the Brigade

1 Ordinary meetings

(1) The brigade may at any time call an Ordinary Meeting of its members.

 

(2) The brigade shall hold a minimum of one (1) Ordinary Meeting between 1 July and 30 June each year or as they deem necessary.

 

(3) A quorum for an Ordinary Meeting shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

 

2 Annual General Meeting (AGM)

(1) The brigade shall hold an AGM in the month of May each calendar year.

 

(2) A quorum for the AGM shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

(3) A report may be presented to the membership by a Brigade Executive Committee Office Bearer

 

(4) At this meeting all Brigade Executive Committee and Brigade Officer positions will be declared vacant.

 

(5) All equipment and documentation relevant to each position is to be made available for auditing at the AGM.

 

(6) The Chairman or proxy will act as returning officer during the election of the new Brigade Executive Committee and brigade officer positions.

 

(7) The incoming Brigade Executive Committee will assume the positions at the close of the AGM.

 

(8) Any outgoing Brigade Executive Committee Member is to conduct a handover to the new incumbent.

 

(9) All minutes of the AGM including financial statements are to be lodged with Executive Officer of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee for the information of the local government within a period no later than twenty-one (21) days after the AGM.

 

3 Special Meeting

(1) The Chairman may at any time convene a special meeting of the brigade.

 

(2) The Secretary of the brigade must convene a special meeting when a written request is made by not less than ten (10) or fifty (50) percent (whichever is least) active members of the brigade?

 

(3) The names of the members requesting the special meeting are to be recorded in the notice of meeting submitted to members and the minutes of the meeting.

 

(4) A quorum for a Special Meeting shall comprise not less than 25% of the eligible voting members of the Brigade.

 

4 Notice of a Meeting

(1) Notice of any Special Meeting of the brigade, must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote at least seventy two (72) hours before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(2) Notice of the AGM of the brigade must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote, as well as the CBFCO, at least thirty (30) days before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(3) Notice of any Ordinary Meeting of the brigade must be given to all members of the brigade eligible to vote, as well as the CBFCO, at least seven (7) days before the commencement of the meeting.

 

(4) Notice of an Ordinary Meeting, Special Meeting or AGM—

(a) must be given by the Secretary;

(b) may be given by written notice to each member—

(i) Personally, by post or electronic email; or

(ii) By a notice published in a newspaper circulating in the area of the brigade;

(c) must set out the date, time, and venue of the meeting;

(d) must be signed by the Secretary or, in the case of a special meeting, by the person convening the meeting; and

(e) must set out an agenda for the meeting.

 

5 Quorum

No formal business is to be transacted at a meeting of the brigade unless a quorum of members is present.

 

6 Voting

(1) Each Active and Auxiliary Member shall be entitled to one (1) vote.

 

 (2) In the event of an equality of votes, the Chairman may exercise the deciding vote.

 

(3) Votes may be counted by either—

(a) formal secret ballot; or

(b) informal show of hands.

 

(4) The form of voting in (3) above shall be determined by a simple majority of members present at the meeting.

 

(5) A member is not deemed to be active and is unable to cast a vote at any meeting of the brigade, unless all requirements in regards to brigade training and activities as set out under section 4.7 have been satisfied.

 

7 Procedure at Meetings

Meeting procedures and protocols are to be in accordance with the brigade’s meeting procedures and protocol guidelines.

 

Part 2—Committee

1 Meetings

(1) Each brigade shall have a Brigade Executive Committee. The Brigade Executive Committee shall meet each calendar month or as required.

 

(2) Any functions of the brigade may be delegated to the Brigade Executive Committee provided that a motion approving of the delegation has been carried at either an Ordinary Meeting or AGM.

 

(3) The Brigade Executive Committee shall consist of the following Office Bearers—

(a) Chairman

(b) Secretary

(c) Treasurer

(d) FCO's

(e) Captain

(f) Other Office Bearers

(g) A Bush Fire Ready Coordinator Representative where this organisation exists and the representative is a member of the Brigade.

 

(4) The Brigade Executive Committee will be responsible for the management and administration of the brigade. The brigade officers are responsible for all operational requirements of the brigade.

 

(5) A motion carried by the vote of a majority of those present at a Brigade Executive Committee meeting shall be accepted as the decision of the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(6) Each Brigade Executive Committee Member present at a meeting of the Brigade Executive Committee shall be entitled to one (1) vote. In the event of an equality of votes the Chairman will be entitled to a second or casting vote.

 

(7) The Secretary must keep accurate minutes of the meeting

 

(8) Minutes of these meetings shall be made available to members of the brigade.

 

(9) The term of all elected positions on the Brigade Executive Committee shall expire at the completion of the next AGM of the brigade.

 

Part 3—Brigade Elections

1 Nomination of Candidates for Brigade Elections

(1) Any person accepting a nomination for a Brigade Executive Committee position must be competent and qualified to perform the duties and responsibilities of that position.

 

(2) The Secretary shall advise the Chairman of the brigade at the general meeting prior to the AGM that nominations are required to be presented at the AGM.

 

(3) A person can only be nominated by an Active Member.

 

(4) A nomination must be endorsed by a second Active Member filling out a Nomination Form in the form of Schedule 1 attached.

 

(5) Each member is only entitled to nominate one (1) person per position.

 

(6) A nomination may be made—

(a) in writing or email to be received by the Chairman before the official close of nominations; or

(b) verbally at a general meeting prior to the AGM.

 

(7) Nominees must sign or indicate acceptance of nomination.

 

(8) Nominees for operational Brigade Officer positions must meet the minimum requirements for training as set out under section 3 of these Rules.

 

(9) Nominees for Brigade Officer positions must accept all requirements imposed by the Local Government, the brigade or legislation.

 

(10) The Brigade Executive Committee will assist and mentor new Brigade Officers in their new roles.

 

(11) The CBFCO or a proxy may act in the position as returning officer during the election of office bearers at the AGM if requested by the brigade.

 

2 Conduct of Elections

(1) Positions shall be determined by vote in accordance with the following order:

 

Order

Officer

Term

1

Chairman

1 year

2

Secretary

1 year

3

Treasurer

1 year

4

FCO Nominations

1 year

5

Captain

1 year

6

Lieutenants

1 year

7

Training Officer

1 year

8

Equipment Officer

1 year

9

Other

1 year

 

(2) Any additional positions to the Brigade Executive Committee or the Brigade are to be elected in accordance with Brigade standard meeting procedures.

 

(3) Any appointment to the office of Bush Fire Control Officer shall not have effect until the nomination has been considered by the Bush Fire Advisory Committee and the appointment has been approved by the local government.

 

3 Absentee Votes

(1) Where a member of the Brigade or the Brigade Executive Committee is not able to be present to cast their vote in person, that member may cast an absent vote.

 

(2) An absent vote shall be cast by the member in writing or email and be received by the brigade secretary prior to the voting on any matter before the meeting.

 

(3) The absent vote shall contain the name of the person casting the vote and some verification of authenticity of the vote (ie signature or email address if voting by email).

 

7.4 Supplementary Elections

Where a supplementary election must be held due to a vacancy in a position as a result of an early resignation or other reason, the Brigade Executive Committee, by majority vote, will appoint a consenting Active Member for the remaining term of the vacant position.

 


 

Schedule 1

NOMINATION FORM

(Part 3 – Brigade Elections - Clause 1(4))

(Name of Brigade) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade

 

I……………………………………….……………………………………………………as an active member of the ………………………………………Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade hereby nominate for the position of (please tick √)–

 

Fire Control Officers

Lieutenant

Captain

Chairman

Secretary

Treasurer

Training Officer

Equipment/Comms Officer

First Aid Officer

Station/Callout Attendant

 

(If nominating for more than one position, separate forms are required)

 

I ............................................................................................................................... as an active member of …………………………………….............. Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade hereby endorse the above nomination.

 

 

Signed _____________________________ Date ____________________

 

Full name of Nominee: ................................................................................................................................. .

Address: .....................................................................................................................................................

Contact Details—

Home: …………………………………………..

Mobile: …………………………………………..

E-mail: …………………………………………..

DFES Identification Number: ………………….

I certify that I have read and understand the duties and responsibilities for the position I have been nominated as specified under the Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Rules and that I have currency in all the competencies required. I understand that if I do not have currency in all the competencies required I can still be nominated subject to the approval of the CBFCO. Such approval may be conditional on further training or other arrangements as deemed necessary.

 

_________________________                  ______________________

Signature                                                             Date

Received by Secretary/Returning Officer—

 

____________________________           _____________

Signature                                                             Date

 


 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Membership

 

08

Policy Membership

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish the classifications of membership within Bush Fire brigades of the City of Busselton and provide for the integration of new members into the brigade.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, persons seeking to become members of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall have an understanding of the commitment expected of a brigade member so that they may contribute in a manner that enhances their experience and value as a member of the brigade.

 

 

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1 New Membership Application

(1) A new member is to complete a DFES volunteer nomination form and accept the conditions for membership.

 

(2) A minimum of two (2) Brigade Executive Committee members, including the Captain, should decide whether to recommend the application to the Senior FCO.

 

(3) At the meeting of the Committee, the brigade Office Bearers may-

(a) Accept Application

(b) Defer the Application for further consideration or:

(c) Refer the application to the Senior FCO for consideration

 

2 Dual Membership

(1) A member may be a member of another local government brigade.

 

(2) A member may not be a member of another brigade within the local government unless they have the written permission of the Senior FCO’s of the brigades concerned. This permission may be conditional.

 

3 Categories of Membership

The categories of membership shall be—

(a) Fire Fighters;

(b) Management Support;

(c) Auxiliary Members;

(d) Cadets, and

(e) Associates.

 

4 Training

(1) A new member is required to complete the necessary Fire Fighter Training Courses as required by the local government prior to commencing active and unsupervised Fire Fighter duties.

 

(2) Competency in these Training Courses shall be the minimum acceptable standard required for a Fire Fighter to perform active and unsupervised fire fighting duties. Currently this includes Induction, Introduction to Fire Fighting and Bush Fire Fighting training Courses.

 

(3) Members must comply with the legislative requirements of the—

(a) Bush Fires Act 1954 (WA);

(b) FESA Act 1998 (WA); and

(c) Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA).

 

(4) Members must act within the—

(a) Local guidelines;

(b) Brigade’s local policies;

(c) Code of Conduct Policy,

(d) Competency and commitment requirements for an active volunteer Fire Fighter or Operation and Management Support roles as required by the CBFCO; and

(e) Westplan Bushfire.

 

(5) Members must maintain currency of the appropriate licenses to be able to operate brigade vehicles. Any traffic offence that results in a suspension or loss of license must be reported to the Captain, the FCO and CBFCO and the member must comply with the terms of their suspension.

 

5 Decision on Application Membership

(1) The Chairman of the brigade must contact the applicant in writing or email within fourteen (14) days of a final decision by the brigade or the CBFCO.

 

(2) The applicant has the right to appeal the decision of the Brigade Executive Committee. The appeal shall be in writing or email addressed to the Senior FCO and Chairman.

 

6 Induction

All new members shall be—

(a) introduced to brigade members and shown all brigade facilities during induction;

(b) instructed about any safety requirements;

(c) made aware of brigade duties and responsibilities;

(d) provided with a mentor/s until such time as they are familiar with Normal Brigade Activities;

(e) provided with a copy of the Code of Conduct Policy, and

(f) made aware of City of Busselton and local brigade guidelines and policies if any exist within that brigade.

 

7 Membership Requirements (Brigade Commitments)

(1) Members are required to maintain currency in brigade activities and training to be deemed as an Active Member and or be granted special considerations due to extenuating circumstances.

 

(2) Brigade Activities—

(a) During the Fire Season members are required to attend a minimum of one (1) brigade ordinary meeting or other brigade activity or incident.

(b) During the Non-Fire Season members are required to attend a minimum of one (1) brigade ordinary meeting or other brigade activity or incident.

 

(3) Brigade Training—

(a) During the Fire Season members are required to attend and participate at a minimum of one (1) brigade training activity or incident.

(b) During the Non-Fire Season members are required to attend and participate at a minimum of one (1) brigade training activity or incident.

 

(4) If extenuating circumstances apply that a member is unable to meet brigade commitments, it shall be the responsibility of the member to notify the Brigade Executive Committee, in writing or email to advise of the circumstance, and the Brigade Executive Committee will acknowledge in writing or email any special considerations to the member.

 

(5) The Training Officer should endeavour to make alternative arrangements for the member to meet the requirements wherever possible.

 

8 Failure to Comply with Commitments

(1) Should an active member of a brigade fail to comply with section 7, correspondence will be forwarded to the member requesting contact be made with the brigade to indicate the intentions of the member’s status.

 

(2) The Brigade Member may—

(a) respond to the correspondence providing a reasonable explanation and request for alternative arrangements to be made for training or meeting obligations.

(b) request in writing or email for Leave of Absence from brigade commitments due to personal circumstances.

(c) terminate their membership.

 

(3) If a member fails to respond to the correspondence Under section 8 within fourteen (14) days a subsequent letter will be forwarded putting the member on final notice. Should a member fail to acknowledge the final notice within fourteen (14) days, the membership shall be terminated, to take effect from the date of the final notice.

 

9 Change of Members Details

The local government and DFES are to be notified of any change of personal details of a member. The brigade will complete a DFES volunteer application form and forward it to the Local Government representative and DFES within fourteen (14) days of the change.

 

10 Leave of Absence

(1) A member may at any time request a Leave of Absence from all brigade commitments for a period not to exceed twelve (12) consecutive months.

 

(2) The application should be made in writing or email and addressed to the Captain. Copy to Brigade FCO’s.

 

(3) On completion of the Leave of Absence period the member must complete a Membership Update Form if deemed necessary providing any change of details and forward to the Captain and FCO’s.

 

(4) On completion of the Leave of Absence period the member must undertake any refresher training required before resuming active fire fighting duties. If the request for Leave of Absence is for a medical condition the member must provide confirmation of fitness to the satisfaction of the CBFCO to be able to resume active duties.


 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency -

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

Policy Qualifications of Brigade Officers

 

08

Policy Qualifications of Brigade Officers

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to establish the qualifications required of persons seeking to hold office within Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton; either in an operational or administrative capacity.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, member of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton shall be informed in advance of required training and qualifications required of Brigade Officers. This will enable members aspiring to become brigade Officers to plan a training pathway to obtain the necessary qualifications.

 

This Policy will also serve to provide direction to the brigade Training Officer on appropriate training that will support a member’s brigade aspirations.

 

 

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

Duties and Responsibilities of Brigade Office Bearers

The Office Bearers of the brigade should be able to demonstrate current competencies for the position of office they are nominated for, or give an undertaking to complete any training requirements prior to accepting the nomination or undertaking the duties and responsibilities of the said position.

 

Nominations are subject to the approval of the Senior FCO. Such approval may be conditional on the nominee undertaking further training or other necessary arrangements to satisfy the competency requirements.

 

The following are to be adopted as guidelines and where competencies names may vary from time to time the member may have an alternative appropriate competency.

 

1 Captain

(1) The Captain of the brigade shall be responsible for the leadership and management of brigade operations in liaison with Fire Control Officers.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Captain of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting and/or support experience

Minimum 3 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

Structural Fire fighting

 

Competent

AIIMS Awareness

 

Competent

 

2 Fire Control Officer (FCO)

(1) A FCO is a delegated representative of the local government responsible for the administration of provisions within the Act. The position is required to perform active operational duties in relation to both fire defence and fire prevention strategies within the local community.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Fire Control Office of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting experience

Minimum 4 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

Structural Fire fighting

 

Competent

AIIMS Awareness

 

Competent

Fire Control Officer

 

Competent

 

3 Lieutenant

(1) The Lieutenant of a brigade is responsible for the operational management of members during brigade activities. The position is required to provide operational support to the Captain in managing the brigade. The position reports to the Captain on all matters relevant to the functioning of the Brigade and/or personnel they are supervising.

 

(2) A member wishing to be appointed to the position of Lieutenant of the brigade shall meet the following combination of technical qualification and experience:

 

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Fire fighting experience

Minimum 3 years

Competent

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

Sector Commander

 

Competent

 

4 Fire Fighter

A Fire Fighter is an active member of the brigade who, when engaging in Brigade operational matters shall act in accordance with the instructions of senior brigade officers.

 

A member shall be a competent fire fighter before being engaged on wildfire suppression duties.

 

The minimum qualifications for a person to be considered competent are as follows:

Qualifications

Experience

Competency Required

Induction

 

Competent

Introduction to Fire fighting

 

Competent

Bush Fire Fighting

 

Competent

 

5 Chairman

The Chairman of the Brigade is elected to preside over all brigade meetings and promote open fair discussion during debate in relation to brigade matters.

 

The occupant of the position of Chairman is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The Chairman must have:

(a) Sound understanding of meeting procedures; and

(b) Demonstrated ability to conduct and manage meetings.

 

6 Secretary

The Secretary is to record and manage administrational matters of the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The occupant of the position of Secretary must have:

(a) Demonstrated ability to take minutes;

(b) Demonstrated record keeping and filing skills;

(c) An understanding of meeting procedure; and

(d) Developing computer skills.

 

7 Treasurer

The role of the Treasurer is to manage and report on all financial matters relevant to the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

The occupant of the position of Treasurer must have:

(a) Knowledge and understanding of accounting principles; and

(b) Developing computer skills.

 

8 Brigade Training Officer

(1) The Brigade Training Officer is responsible for the management and co-ordination of brigade training in conjunction with the Local Government Training Coordinator, including the documentation of these activities. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2) Duties and Responsibilities of the Brigade Training Officer may include—

(a) Ensure brigade members maintain necessary skill levels equivalent to the competency standards required by the local government and as recommended by DFES;

(b) Endeavour to ensure regular training sessions are conducted within the brigade to maintain currency of qualifications and skills;

(c) Maintain accurate records of training undertaken by members and ensure that qualification and training updates are forwarded to the Local Government Training Coordinator as required;

(d) Provide mentoring for members who express an interest in training to encourage future facilitators.

(e) Liaise with Captain and FCO's on training operations

 

9 Brigade Equipment Officer

The Brigade Equipment Officer is not required to perform active operational duties but needs to be able to demonstrate a degree of knowledge of brigade equipment.

 

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy - Roles of Brigade Officers

 

08

Draft Policy Roles of Brigade Officers

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

 

The purpose of this policy is to establish the roles of persons appointed as officers of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, officers of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton, shall have a clear understanding of the extent of their authority and how their role will contribute to the strong management and operations of the brigade.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

Roles and Responsibilities of Brigade Office Bearers

 

Office bearers of a brigade shall perform the following roles:

 

1 Captain

(1) The Captain of the brigade shall be responsible for the leadership and management of brigade operations in liaison with Fire Control Officers.

 

(2) As a role model and mentor for members, the Captain should always act with integrity and consider each member equally. All decisions should be in the interest of the Brigade and its members.

 

(3) The position reports to the FCO's and the CBFCO on brigade related matters.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of the Captain include—

(a) Demonstrate positive leadership and mentor members;

(b) If the Captain is the senior officer at an incident;

(i) command, control and confidently manage activities at emergency incidents

(ii) to ensure incident control systems and management principles are implemented and maintained during all emergency incidents if required;

(iii) maintain some form of personal incident diary with a record of events and decisions that occur at an incident;

(iv) conduct Brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting, incident support or management issues;

(v) ensure members deployed for operational duties have the competencies to complete the task or duty assigned and hold currency in training to carry out the functions required, in accordance with training recommendations;

(vi) to undertake responsibility for the proper management and maintenance of Brigade property and equipment to the best of their ability;

(vii) ensure conduct of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct, and

(viii) report any injuries of personnel or damage to fire fighting vehicles or equipment immediately to the FCO and the CBFCO.

 

(5) In the absence of the Captain, the next senior officer of the brigade has authority to exercise the powers of the Act delegated to the Captain (Part IV Section 44(1)).

 

2 Fire Control Officer (FCO)

(1) A FCO is a delegated representative of the local government responsible for the administration of provisions within the Act. The position is required to perform active operational duties in relation to both fire defence and fire prevention strategies within the local community.

 

(2) A member of the Brigade may be nominated for this position at the Brigade AGM.

 

(3) Fire Control Officers are nominated by the brigade to the Bush Fire Advisory Committee. The nomination is considered by BFAC and the CBFCO and if appropriate it is forwarded to the local government for its consideration and ratification.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of the FCO include—

(a) authorise permits for hazard reduction burns within the local government in accordance with the Act;

(b) identify and conduct risk assessments of fire hazards within the local government;

(c) perform duties prescribed by the Act and authorised by the local government;

(d) may take overall control of fire suppression activities or operational incidents where the local government is the Controlling Agency;

(e) maintain a personal incident diary to include a record of events and decisions during an incident;

(f) conduct brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting or management issues.

(g) Provide advice and guidance and assist in Brigade management to effect improvements to fire management in the area.

(h) carry out normal brigade activities

(i) ensure conduct of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct.

 

3 Lieutenant

(1) The Lieutenant of a brigade is responsible for the operational management of members during brigade activities. The position is required to provide operational support to the Captain in managing the brigade. The position reports to the Captain on all matters relevant to the functioning of the Brigade and/or personnel they are supervising.

 

(2) The Brigade should appoint a minimum of two (2) Lieutenants. Additional Lieutenants may be appointed according to the needs of the Brigade. If operational circumstances require the number of Lieutenants for a brigade to be more than four (4), as decided by the Brigade Executive Committee, a request is to be submitted in writing or email to the CBFCO for endorsement.

 

(3) The brigade must rank all Lieutenants numerically according to seniority including length of service and relevant skills.

 

(4) Duties and responsibilities of a Lieutenant include—

(a) provide support to the Captain and assist with the operational management of the brigade;

(b) in the absence of the Captain administer all powers and responsibilities of the Act (Part IV Section 44(1));

(c) command and manage members during emergencies and other brigade related incidents and activities;

(d) maintain a personal incident diary with a record of events that occur during all incidents if assuming the role of the most Senior Officer;

(e) in the absence of a more Senior Officer, conduct brigade briefings and post incident analysis of any incident involving fire fighting or management issues;

(f) encourage positive interaction and teamwork between members;

(g) ensure Bush Fire Operating Procedures are adhered to at brigade activities;

(h) to endeavour to ensure active members engaged in brigade activities are allocated tasks relevant to their competencies;

(i) work cohesively with the Brigade Training Officer to conduct training activities for active members;

(j) to ensure the behaviour of members is in accordance with the Code of Conduct.

 

3.4 Chairman

(1) The Chairman of the Brigade shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting of the Brigade, or a Special Meeting of the Brigade held for that purpose.

 

(2) The Chairman shall be elected by a majority of the members present at the meeting, subject to sufficient members of the meeting being present to constitute a quorum.

 

(3) The occupant of the position of Chairman is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

(4) The position reports to the Captain and FCO's on administrative matters pertinent to the brigade. In the absence of the Chairman, the members of the Brigade present shall elect one of the members present to deputise as Chairman for the duration of that meeting.

 

(5) The Chairman shall perform the following functions—

(a) preside over all brigade meetings;

(b) ensure meeting procedure and protocol is maintained;

(c) promote the aims and objectives of the brigade where possible;

(d) advise the brigade on administrative matters;

(e) report brigade matters to the Captain and FCO's;

(f) promote open fair discussion during debate in relation to brigade matters; and

(g) ensure minutes of meetings are signed and dated by the Chairman.

 

5 Secretary

(1) The Secretary is to record and manage administrational matters of the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an additional position held within the brigade.

 

(2) The position reports to the Chairman on administration matters relevant to the brigade. This position may be held in conjunction with the Treasurer position.

 

(3) The Secretary shall perform the following functions—

(a) Ensure members receive notification of brigade meetings in accordance with Council Policy – Meetings of Brigades,

(b) Where deemed appropriate, prepare an agenda for brigade meetings and distribute to members prior to meetings;

(c) Ensure minutes of brigade meetings are recorded and where ever possible, distributed to all members prior to next meeting;

(d) Document and record all brigade correspondence;

(e) Ensure brigade information is disseminated to all listed members;

(f) Make available circulars and other information to members;

(g) Work cohesively with local government management and administration staff on matters relevant to brigade administration.

(h) Maintain a register of Brigade Members

 

6 Treasurer

(1) The role of the Treasurer is to manage and report on all financial matters relevant to the brigade. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2)The position reports to the Chairman on financial matters relevant to the brigade. This position may be held in conjunction with the Secretary position.

 

(3) The Treasurer shall perform the following functions—

(a) Manage financial affairs including budgets of the brigade;

(b) Maintain brigade financial records and provide detailed reports of income and expenditure at meetings;

(c) Work cohesively with the City of Busselton on matters pertinent to brigade financial matters, including providing copies of financial statements when requested.

 

 

7 Brigade Training Officer

(1) The Brigade Training Officer is responsible for the management and co-ordination of brigade training in conjunction with the Local Government Training Coordinator, including the documentation of these activities. The position is not required to perform active operational duties and may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

The Office is expected to maintain a sound knowledge of the Competencies required by members.

 

(2) Duties and Responsibilities of the Brigade Training Officer may include—

(a) Ensure brigade members maintain necessary skill levels equivalent to the competency standards required by the local government and as recommended by DFES;

(b) Endeavour to ensure regular training sessions are conducted within the brigade to maintain currency of qualifications and skills;

(c) Maintain accurate records of training undertaken by members and ensure that qualification and training updates are forwarded to the Local Government Training Coordinator as required;

(d) Provide mentoring for members who express an interest in training to encourage future facilitators.

(e) Liaise with Captain and FCO's on training operations.

 

8 Brigade Equipment Officer

(1) The role of the Brigade Equipment Officer is to manage brigade property, fleet vehicles, general equipment and stock levels of personal protective equipment. The position is not required to perform active operational duties but may be able to demonstrate a degree of knowledge of brigade equipment. The position may be inclusive to an operational position held within the brigade.

 

(2) The equipment officer shall perform the following functions—

(a) Manage brigade equipment and maintain a register of all assets;

(b) Coordinate and record maintenance of brigade equipment;

(c) Report all damage of brigade equipment or property to the FCO's and Captain immediately;

(d) Manage brigade requests for replacement items and equipment; and

(e) Compile documentation of replacement items and submit to the Captain and FCO's and CBFCO.

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

 

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy Brigade Accounting

 

08

Draft Policy Brigade Accounting

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that the financial affairs of Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton are conducted in a manner that will ensure accountability of community funds.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, the City of Busselton seeks to ensure that the financial affairs of volunteer bush fire brigades are managed in a manner that will ensure that brigade and community members can be satisfied that any funds held by the brigade are properly accounted for, and are used for the purposes for which they were raised.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1 Accounts at Financial Institutions

(1) The brigade must disclose where brigade account(s) are to be held for the ensuing Financial Year at each AGM and record this information within the minutes of the AGM.

 

(2) The brigade must have three (3) Brigade Executive Committee Members to act as signatories for the brigade accounts each Financial Year.

 

(3) A minimum of two (2) signatures is required on any brigade account cheque or bank transaction form.

 

(4) All brigade purchases are to be approved by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(5) All accounts raised, works undertaken or goods to be purchased by the brigade must be authorised in advance by the Brigade Executive Committee.

 

(6) All accounts raised, works undertaken or goods to be purchased need to be ratified by the brigade at the next Ordinary Meeting.

 

(7) All funds raised by the brigade are to be used for the purpose of improving the profile and operation of the brigade and its members.

 

(8) All payments issued must be accompanied by the appropriate documentation (invoice or monthly account).

 

(9) All money received by the brigade or by a member on behalf of the brigade must be recorded in the brigade financial records.

 

2 Financial Reports

(1)  The Treasurer must, at each AGM, present a financial report for the previous 12-month period or since the last AGM.

 

(2) The financial report must include—

(a) a Statement of Receipts and Payments;

(b) a Bank Reconciliation Statement;

(c) notes detailing any outstanding receipts or payments; and

(d) an Inventory of Assets held by the brigade.

 

3) The financial report will be forwarded to the Executive Officer of the Bush Fire Advisory Committee for the information of the local government

 

(4)The City shall have the option to re/view the financial statement of any brigade if it considers it is necessary, and may undertake an audit if required by the Chief Executive Officer

 

3 Rules for Deductible Gift Recipient Funds

(1) If a Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade establishes a Fire and Emergency Public Fund, the fund called the “(insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund” is to be governed by this policy.

(2) The object of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund is to solicit and receive gifts from the public solely for the purpose of supporting the volunteer-based emergency service activities of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade.

(3) The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade must maintain the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund as a ‘gift fund’ to receive and record all of the following:

a) gifts of money or property;

b) deductible contributions described in item 7 and 8 of the table in section 30-15 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 in relation to a fund-raising event held for that purpose;

c) money received because of such gifts and contributions.

 

(4) The public fund is not to receive any other money or property.

 

(5). All receipts for gifts must include all of the following:

a) be issued in the name of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund;

b) state that the receipt is for a gift;

c) state the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade’s ABN.

 

(6). The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade may invite the public to donate to the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund.

(7). A Brigade Executive Committee of management of no fewer than three persons will be appointed by the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade to administer the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund. A majority of the members of the Brigade Executive committee of management are required to be persons having a degree of responsibility to the general community by reason of their occupation or standing in the community.

(8) The (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund (Fund) shall operate on a non-profit basis. No portion of the assets or income of the Fund will be distributed directly or indirectly to members of (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade or the Fund’s management Brigade Executive committee apart from bona fide compensation for services rendered or expenses incurred on behalf of the Fund.

(9) If the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund is wound up or if the endorsement of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade as a deductible gift recipient for the operation of the Fund is revoked, any surplus assets of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund remaining after the payment of liabilities attributable to it, shall be transferred to a fund, authority or institution which has similar objects and to which income tax deductible gifts can be made.

(10). (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade must notify the Australian Taxation Office in writing or email if it is no longer entitled to be endorsed for the operation of the (insert Brigade name) Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade Public Fund, or of any changes that would affect its entitlement to endorsement.

 

 

Policy Background

 

Policy Reference No. –

Owner Unit – Ranger & Emergency Services

Originator – Ranger & Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History –

 

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Policy Code of Conduct Values and Objectives

 

08

Draft Policy – Code of Conduct, Brigade Objectives and Values

V1 Current

 

PURPOSE

 

Objective

The purpose of this policy is to establish core values that underpin membership of, and the operations of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton.

 

SCOPE

 

Policy Statement

 

Through the application of this Policy, Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades of the City of Busselton, and the members of those brigades will conduct themselves in a manner that is worthy of the respect of the community in acknowledgement of their dedication to community values and safety.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

1. Code of Conduct

The City of Busselton has established Volunteer Bush Fire brigades pursuant to the powers enabling the City contained in Section 41 of the Bush Fires Act 1954.

 

As members of Volunteer Bush Fire Brigades established under the Act, members of the brigade are officers of the City and as such are expected at all times to conduct themselves in a manner that is

1.    consistent with the best interests of the brigade,

2.    is in line with the organisational chain of command for both fire fighting and brigade activities, and

3.    does not in any way bring discredit to either the brigade, it’s members or the City.

 

To this end, the City of Busselton has adopted the  Code of Conduct for Volunteer Bush Fire Fighters. Members of Brigades are required to commit to the standards of the Code and be governed by the Code.

 

Any person who is a member of a Brigade, when acting in that capacity shall:

Act with reasonable care and diligence;

Act with honesty and integrity;

Act lawfully;

Avoid damage to the reputation of the local government;

Be open and accountable;

Base decisions on relevant and factually correct information;

Treat others with respect and fairness;

Not be impaired by mind affecting substances.

Fulfil their public and professional duties in a manner that is ethical, impartial, objective and responsible;

Not use or attempt to use their positions for personal benefit or the personal benefit of others, either by influencing others, the improper use of information gained in the performance of their duties, or otherwise;

Understand and be mindful of their role, responsibilities, empowerment and limitations and act within those parameters

Refrain from making allegations which are improper or derogatory, unless true, in the public interest and in an appropriate forum;

Refrain from any form of conduct in the performance of their official or professional duties which may cause any reasonable person unwarranted offence or embarrassment.

 

2 Brigade Objectives

 

The Brigade shall undertake the following objectives—

(a) provide timely, efficient and effective emergency services;

(b) minimise the impact of emergencies on the community;

(c) work with the community to increase bush fire awareness and fire prevention;

(d) ensure that active Members’ training requirements are maintained and documented to meet City of Busselton and DFES standards

(e) ensure all operational equipment is serviceable and available for emergencies;

(f) provide an environment where every individual is treated with respect, and which is free from discrimination or harassment;

(g) uphold the City of Busselton’s Policy - Code of Conduct; brigade Objective and Values; and

(h) service the needs of the community and work cohesively with other agencies.

 

3 Brigade Values

 

(1) Members are to adopt the Brigade values at all times when representing the Brigade in accordance with the Code of Conduct as in Clause 3.

 

(2) The Brigade values include—

(a) Put the community first;

(b) Act with integrity and honesty;

(c) Work together as a committed team;

(d) Strive to keep ourselves and others safe;

(e) Respect and value the contribution of others;

(f) Have open and honest two way communication; and

(g) Continuously develop our skills to improve our service to the community.

 

Policy Reference No. – 015

Owner Unit – Ranger and Emergency Services

Originator - Ranger and Emergency Services Coordinator

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved -

Review Frequency - As required

Related Documents - Acts, Regulations and Local Laws administered by the City

Background/History -

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

 

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


 

10.3           Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - ORGANISATION WIDE RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY

SUBJECT INDEX:

Risk Management

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

An organisation that is managed effectively and achieves positive outcomes for the community.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Corporate Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Employee Services & Risk

REPORTING OFFICER:

Risk and OSH Officer - Brian McCarroll

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Finance and Corporate Services - Matthew Smith

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   Organisation Wide Risk Management Policy With Tracked Changes  

 

This item was considered by the Policy and Legislation Committee at its meeting on 30 July 2015, the recommendations from which have been included in this report. 

 

PRÉCIS

 

The Council has an existing Organisation Wide Risk Management Policy.  This policy has been reviewed as part of the City’s rolling review of Council policies and is now presented for updating.

 

BACKGROUND

 

The purpose of the Organisation Wide Risk Management Policy (the Policy) is to demonstrate the City’s commitment to the development of a culture of risk based decision making aimed at the effective management of potential opportunities and reduction of potential impacts of risk.

 

Council adopted version 1 of the Organisation Wide Risk Management Policy on 10 May 2006 to provide overall guidance.  Since then there has been a number of reviews with the most significant changes being the change in the Australian Standard to AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009, reflecting the standard we align our Risk Management Framework to, and the inclusion of responsibilities for the Audit committee established to assist Council to fulfil its corporate governance, stewardship, leadership and control responsibilities in relation to risk management.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

In accordance with Section 2.7(2)(b) of the Local Government Act 1995 it is the role of the Council to determine the local government’s policies.  The Council does this on the recommendation of a Committee it has established in accordance with Section 5.8 of that Act.

 

Regulation 17 of the Local Government (Audit) Regulations states:

 

“17. CEO to review certain systems and procedures

(1)  The CEO is to review the appropriateness and effectiveness of a local government’s systems and procedures in relation to –

(a)  risk management; and

(b)  internal control; and

(c)   legislative compliance.

(2)  The review may relate to any or all of the matters referred to in subregulation (1)(a), (b) and (c), but each of those matters is to be the subject of a review at least once every 2 calendar years.

(3)  The CEO is to report to the audit committee the results of that review.”

 

The Audit Committee received the results of the City’s first review in November 2014.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

This report recommends the update of Policy 234 – Organisational Wide Risk Management.

 

As per the requirements of the Policy, the City has a Risk Management Framework which was endorsed by the Senior Management Group in December 2011The framework outlines the City’s formal risk management system and processes for the management of risks.  Specifically it outlines:

·    The definition of risk and risk management

·    The City’s risk reference tables

·    The risk tolerance levels

·    The risk management processes and procedures

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There are no financial implications associated with this matter.

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Nil

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

This policy will contribute to the achievement of the key goal area of Open and Collaborative Leadership, and the community objectives of:

·    “Governance systems that deliver responsible, ethical and accountable decision making”, and

·    “An organisation that is managed effectively and achieves positive outcomes for the community.”

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

The proposed improvements do not present any risks to Council.

 

CONSULTATION

 

Nil

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

The review of the Policy has resulted in minor improvements aimed at ensuring a clear purpose statement and a clear set of responsibilities at all levels. 

 

The Policy reflects some changes in terminology with the previously referred to Risk Management Plan now referred to as the Risk Management Framework.  This is to better align with the terminology of AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009, the Australian Standard relating to Risk management – Principles and guidelines. 

 

The Policy introduces a new requirement for the Risk Management Committee to develop a Risk Management Plan, detailing the specific actions to be taken each year to further improve the City’s risk management processes and culture. 

 

References to “Shire” have been changed to “City”. 

 

CONCLUSION

 

The changes being proposed, while minor, seek to strengthen the Policy’s intent and provide a clear overview of responsibilities.  The Policy has also been updated to reflect standard risk management terminology.

 

OPTIONS

 

The Council could choose not to change the policy or to make additional changes to the policy.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

The policy update would be effective immediately.

 

Council Decision / Committee Recommendation and Officer Recommendation

C1508/217              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council:

 

1.    Adopts the following updated Organisational Wide Risk Management Policy:

a)         PURPOSE

i.  The purpose of this policy is to demonstrate the City of Busselton’s commitment to the development of a culture of risk based decision making directed towards the effective management of potential opportunities and reduction of potential impacts of risk.

b)        SCOPE

i.  This policy applies to all Councillors and employees of the City of Busselton and covers all City operations.

c)         POLICY STATEMENT

i.  Risk Management is the systematic application of management policies, practices and procedures in order to identify, analyse, evaluate, treat and monitor risk.  The City of Busselton is committed to the effective management of risk and will implement a Risk Management Framework based on the AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Standard to achieve this.

ii. The Council recognises that adequate resources are needed to effectively manage risks. A Risk Management Committee has been established to be responsible for developing, maintaining and assisting in the implementation of the City’s Risk Management Framework. The Risk Management Committee is to ensure that all of the risk management processes are fully documented and managed through the records management system.

d)        Responsibilities

The Council is responsible for:

*         Ensuring that a Risk Management Policy has been developed, adopted and communicated throughout the City.

*         Ensuring that the CEO has implemented the Risk Management Framework using Standard AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009.

*         Communicating with the community about the City’s approach to risk

*         Establishment of an Audit Committee

 

The Audit Committee is responsible for:

*         Assisting the Council to fulfil its corporate governance, stewardship, leadership and control responsibilities in relation to risk management.

*         Providing guidance and assistance in relation to risk management initiatives and the effective conduct of risk management activities.

 

CEO and the Senior Management Group are responsible for:

*         Developing and implementing the City’s Risk Management Framework

*         As part of the Risk Management Framework establishing the risk tolerance level of the City.

*         Conducting risk assessments as part of decision making & future planning.

 

Risk Management Committee is responsible for:

*         Communicating the policy and framework to all employees.

*         Developing and managing the risk management plan for the City.

*         Development of Risk Management skills through training and education.

*         Establishing and maintaining an appropriate risk register or risk registers for the City.

 

Management are responsible for:

*         Identifying and assessing all the risks in their area of responsibility as part of business planning reporting, project management and daily decision making.

*         Collating, assessing, treating and reporting to the Risk Management Committee in relation to areas and tasks under their responsibility.

          

All Employees are to:

*         Comply with the City’s risk management policy and procedures.

*         Attend relevant risk management training.

*         Actively participate in the risk management programme.

 

Policy Background

Policy Reference No. - 234

Owner Unit – Employee Services and Risk

Originator – Risk Management

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved – 27 July, 2011

Review Frequency – As required

 

References

 

Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 - Risk Management Principles and Guidelines.

 

 

History

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

C1107/229

27 July, 2011

Version 2

C0605/146

10 May, 2006

Date of implementation.

Version 1

 

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      63                                                                 12 August 2015

10.4           Policy and Legislation Committee - 30/07/2015 - OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY

SUBJECT INDEX:

Occupational Safety and Health

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

Governance systems that deliver responsible, ethical and accountable decision-making.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Corporate Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Employee Services and Risk

REPORTING OFFICER:

Risk and OSH Officer - Brian McCarroll

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Finance and Corporate Services - Matthew Smith

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   Occupational Safety and Health Policy With Tracked Changes  

 

This item was considered by the Policy and Legislation Committee at its meeting on 30 July 2015, the recommendations from which have been included in this report. 

 

PRÉCIS

 

The Council has an existing Occupational Safety and Health Policy.  This policy has been reviewed as part of the City’s rolling review of Council policies and is now presented for updating.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

The purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Policy (the Policy) is to demonstrate the City’s commitment to providing for and ensuring a safe and healthy work environment for all people.

 

Council adopted version 1 of the Occupational Safety and Health Policy on 10 May 2006.  Since then there has been a number of reviews with the most recent being in 2011.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

In accordance with Section 2.7(2)(b) of the Local Government Act 1995 it is the role of the Council to determine the local government’s policies.  The Council does this on the recommendation of a Committee it has established in accordance with Section 5.8 of that Act.

 

The Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 (the Act) is the main piece of legislation that regulates health and safety in the workplace in Western Australia.  The Act outlines the duties of care for employers and employees and the duties and responsibilities of both the employer and employee. 

 

The objects of the Act are:

(a)              to promote and secure the safety and health of persons at work;

(b)              to protect persons at work against hazards;

(c)               to assist in securing safe and hygienic work environments;

(d)              to reduce, eliminate and control the hazards to which persons are exposed at work;

(e)              to foster co-operation and consultation between and to provide for the participation of employers and employees and associations representing employers and employees in the formulation and implementation of safety and health standards to current levels of technical knowledge and development;

(f)               to provide for formulation of policies and for the co-ordination of the administration of laws relating to occupational safety and health;

(g)              to promote education and community awareness on matters relating to occupational safety and health.

 

The Act should be read in conjunction with the Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The City has a significant number of operational plans, practices and procedures in place which are aimed at ensuring organisational compliance with the Act and creating a safe and healthy workplace.  These include but are not limited to:

·    Protective Clothing and Equipment

·    First Aid

·    Workplace Inspections

·    Occupational Safety and Health Management Plan

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There are no financial implications associated with this matter.

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Nil

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

This policy will contribute to the achievement of the key goal area of Open and Collaborative Leadership, and the community objectives of:

·    “Governance systems that deliver responsible, ethical and accountable decision making”, and

·    “An organisation that is managed effectively and achieves positive outcomes for the community.”

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

The proposed improvements do not present any risks to Council.

 

CONSULTATION

 

The Occupational Safety and Health Committee, which consists of a management representative from each directorate and a number of employee representatives (as required by the OSH Act), was consulted on the proposed enhancements.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

The review of the Policy has resulted in minor improvements aimed at ensuring a commitment to continuous improvement and accountability.  The focus on continuous improvement was recommended in an external audit report on the Occupational Safety and Health Management System.  Accountability for Occupational Safety and Health responsibilities is crucial to ensuring all parties meet their duty of care.

 

The revised Policy includes reference to the duty of care that both employers and employees have under the Act.  The Act aims to show that all parties have a responsibility for occupational health and safety including:

·       Employers

·       Employees

·       Self-employed persons

·       People who have control of workplaces or the access to or aggress from a workplace

In relation to the employer duty, Section 19 of the Act states:

 

An employer shall, so far as is practicable, provide and maintain a working environment in which the employees of the employer (the employees) are not exposed to hazards and in particular, but without limiting the generality of the foregoing, an employer shall —

                        (a)      provide and maintain workplaces, plant, and systems of work such that, so far as is practicable, the employees are not exposed to hazards; and

                        (b)      provide such information, instruction, and training to, and supervision of, the employees as is necessary to enable them to perform their work in such a manner that they are not exposed to hazards; and

                        (c)      consult and cooperate with safety and health representatives, if any, and other employees at the workplace, regarding occupational safety and health at the workplace; and

                        (d)      where it is not practicable to avoid the presence of hazards at the workplace, provide the employees with, or otherwise provide for the employees to have, such adequate personal protective clothing and equipment as is practicable to protect them against those hazards, without any cost to the employees; and

                        (e)      make arrangements for ensuring, so far as is practicable, that —

                                         (i)      the use, cleaning, maintenance, transportation and disposal of plant; and

                                        (ii)      the use, handling, processing, storage, transportation and disposal of substances,

                                    at the workplace is carried out in a manner such that the employees are not exposed to hazards.

 

In relation to the employee duty, Section 20 of the Act states:

 

(1) An employee shall take reasonable care —

                        (a)      to ensure his or her own safety and health at work; and

                       (b)      to avoid adversely affecting the safety or health of any other person through any act or omission at work.

(2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), an employee contravenes that subsection if the employee —

                        (a)      fails to comply, so far as the employee is reasonably able, with instructions given by the employee’s employer for the safety or health of the employee or for the safety or health of other persons; or

                        (b)      fails to use such protective clothing and equipment as is provided, or provided for, by his or her employer as mentioned in section 19(1)(d) in a manner in which he or she has been properly instructed to use it; or

                        (c)      misuses or damages any equipment provided in the interests of safety or health; or

                        (d)      fails to report forthwith to the employee’s employer —

                                         (i)      any situation at the workplace that the employee has reason to believe could constitute a hazard to any person that the employee cannot correct; or

                                        (ii)      any injury or harm to health of which he or she is aware that arises in the course of, or in connection with, his or her work.

 

While the Policy does not set out these duties in full it does bow provide a direct link to them.

References to “Shire” have been changed to “City”. 

CONCLUSION

 

The changes being proposed, while minor, seek to strengthen the Policy’s intent and provide a clear overview of responsibilities. 

 

OPTIONS

 

The Council could choose not to change the policy or to make additional changes to the policy.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

The policy update would be effective immediately.

 

Council Decision / Committee Recommendation and Officer Recommendation

C1508/218              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council:

 

PURPOSE

 

The purpose of this policy is to demonstrate the commitment of the City of Busselton to ensuring a safe and healthy work environment for employees, Councillors, contractors, volunteers and visitors of the City of Busselton.

 

SCOPE

 

This Policy applies to all employees, contractors, volunteers and Councillors and to all City workplaces.

 

POLICY CONTENT

 

The City of Busselton regards the provision of a safe and healthy work environment as fundamental to all organisational activities and essential to maintaining high standards of organisational sustainability, performance and governance.  The following objectives and responsibilities will aid the City of Busselton in achieving these standards:

 

1.            Objectives

*             Comply with legislative requirements under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 and other relevant legislation;

*             Comply with AS/NZS 4801 Occupational Health and Safety Management systems;

*             Develop an organisational culture with a high level of safety and health awareness through a continuous improvement process focused on consultation, communication, information provision, training and accountability.

 

2.            Responsibilities

2.1          Councillors

*             Ensure sufficient resources are available to achieve the objectives of this policy. 

2.2          CEO and Directors

*             Ensure that this policy is implemented.

*             Ensure the development, implementation and maintenance of a management plan to achieve compliance with AS/NZS 4801.

*             Ensure accountability for compliance with this policy is maintained.

*             Meet the City’s duty of care as employer under the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1984

*             Promote the importance and benefit of occupational safety and health throughout the organisation.

2.3          Managers and Supervisors

*             Plan, implement and budget for strategies to ensure hazards are controlled, as far as practicable.

*             Ensure accountability for compliance with safe work practices and safety related operational practices and procedures is maintained.

*             Enforce safety and health requirements within areas of responsibility.

*             Meet the City’s duty of care as employer under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984

2.4          Employees, Contractors and Volunteers

*             Work with care for their own safety and health and that of others.

*             Meet the duty of care as employee under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984.

*             Comply with the City of Busselton safety and health requirements.

 

Policy Background

 

Policy Reference No. - 233

Owner Unit – Employee Services and Risk

Originator – Human Resources Manager

Policy approved by – Council

Date Approved – 27 July, 2011

Review Frequency – As required

Related Documents –

Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act 1984

Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Regulations 1996

AS/NZS 4801 Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems

 

History

 

Council Resolution

Date

Information

 

2015

Version 3

C1107/229

27 July, 2011

Version 2

C0605/145

10 May, 2006

Date of implementation.

Former safety policy repealed in favour of new Occupational Safety and Health Policy following a safety audit against AS4801 requiring significant changes.

Version 1

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      69                                                                 12 August 2015

11.             Planning and Development Services Report

11.1           AMENDMENT NO. 16 TO LOCAL PLANNING SCHEME 21 - RECODE PORTION OF LOT 519 BELL DRIVE, BROADWATER FROM 'RESIDENTIAL R20' TO 'RESIDENTIAL R40'

SUBJECT INDEX:

Town Planning Schemes and Amendments

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

A City of shared, vibrant and well planned places that provide for diverse activity and strengthen our social connections.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Strategic Planning and Development

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Strategic Planning and Development

REPORTING OFFICER:

Senior Strategic Planner - Helen Foulds

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Planning and Development Services - Paul Needham

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   Location Plan

Attachment b    Scheme Amendment Map

Attachment c    Development Concept Plans  

  

 

PRÉCIS

 

The Council is requested to consider initiating for advertising proposed Scheme Amendment No. 16 to Local Planning Scheme No. 21 (LPS21) to recode a portion of Lo 519 Bell Drive, Broadwater from ‘Residential R20’ to ‘Residential R40’.

 

The site exhibits favourable attributes for medium density development given its location and its large size which will allow for an integrated development.  It is considered that the proposal is broadly consistent with the strategic planning framework applicable to the area and officers are recommending that the proposed amendment be initiated to allow public consultation to be undertaken.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Lot 519 is a large 2.6 hectare land parcel that contains the existing aged care facility known as ‘Ellenvale’ at the corner of Broadwater Boulevard and Bell Drive.  Lot 519 has approval for subdivision into three lots, with ‘proposed Lot 200’ being the 3,546m2 area of land physically separated from the remainder of the original land holding by Bell Drive (refer to Attachment A).  At the time of writing this report, the proponent was in the process of finalising the subdivision.

 

The lot is located directly across Broadwater Boulevard from the wetlands and is surrounded by ‘Residential R20’ zoned land, with areas of ‘R40’ coded land further to the north (Novacare Village and a section of Milkman Avenue).

 

The proposal comprises a scheme amendment that seeks to amend the Scheme map in relation to proposed Lot 200 by increasing the residential density code from ‘R20’ to ‘R40’ (see Attachment B).

 

The proposed amendment would facilitate the development of proposed Lot 200 for 16 multiple dwellings on the corner lot, complementing Ellenvale located on the opposing corner.  The balance of the original land holding of Lot 519, referred to as ‘proposed Lot 202’, is envisaged to be developed as over 55’s Aged Person’s Dwellings in the form of grouped dwellings at a later stage.

 

The proponent submits that the site of proposed Lot 200 is well suited to the proposed multiple dwelling development concept as it provides views across the Broadwater wetlands and is situated on the corner of Bell Drive and Broadwater Boulevard, thereby providing opportunity to address the streetscape with a strong residential interface and car parking behind the proposed residential built form.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

The Planning and Development Act 2005 outlines the relevant considerations when preparing and amending local planning schemes. The relevant provisions of the Act have been taken into account in preparing and processing this amendment.

 

The City of Busselton Local Planning Scheme No. 21 (the Scheme) identifies the subject land within the ‘Residential’ zone, with a coding of ‘R20’.  An objective of the Residential zone is:

 

“(b)     To provide opportunity for the development of a wide range of housing stock commensurate with the changing characteristics and housing needs of the City’s population.”

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The key policy implications for consideration of the proposed amendment are set out in the Western Australian Planning Commission Regional Strategy: South-West Framework, State Planning Policy No.3 - Urban Growth and Settlement, Liveable Neighbourhoods, and State Planning Policy No.3.1 – Residential Design Codes of WA and the City of Busselton Broadwater Structure Plan Precinct 1.  Each is discussed below under appropriate subheadings.

 

WAPC Regional Strategy: South-West Framework

 

The WAPC Regional Strategy: South-West Framework, which has been released in final form, contains a number of particularly relevant recommendations, including –

 

WAPC position on settlement and building sustainable communities

 

1.         Planning for settlements in the region to be truly liveable, with a strong sense of place, high quality of life and that are designed to be environmentally sustainable through:

*   promoting mixed use and higher density residential forms in appropriate locations and in major centres and towns;

*   facilitating high quality urban design that is sensitive to, and enhances the identity and character of the South-West’s towns and settlements…

2.         Using appropriate planning processes to: …

*   encourage more diversity of housing product through lot size and built form. …

*   establish mechanisms to provide more affordable housing product diversity and identify other options to provide more affordable housing choices

3.         Build on existing communities with established infrastructure and services through:

*   Identifying and using vacant and under utilised land for higher densities where they can be achieved without detriment to neighbourhood character or the natural environment and encourage carefully planned urban expansion…

 

The proposal is considered to be consistent with these objectives.

 

State Planning Policy No.3 – Urban Growth and Settlement/Liveable Neighbourhoods

 

One of the main features of the Urban Growth and Settlement Policy is to create sustainable communities with access for all to employment, health, education, shops, leisure and community facilities by locating new development so as to be accessible by foot, bicycle or public transport rather than having to depend on access by car.

 

This principle is also reinforced within Liveable Neighbourhoods which advances the principle of an urban structure of walkable neighbourhoods clustered to form towns of compatibly mixed uses in order to reduce car dependence for access to employment, retail and community facilities.

 

The proposal is considered to be consistent with these objectives.

 

State Planning Policy No.3.1 – Residential Design Codes of WA

 

The Residential Design Codes (R-Codes) provides the basis for control of residential development throughout Western Australia.  Table 1 and Table 4 of the R-Codes outline the general site area requirements that apply to residential land.

 

In the case where multiple dwellings are proposed on land coded R20, the R-Codes specify a minimum site area of 450m2 per dwelling.  Given the total area of the site (3,546m2), this would equate to a maximum allowance of 7 multiple dwellings; where the proponent contends and officers accept that at least 16 multiple dwellings would be required to achieve an appropriate and viable housing project. 

 

The more flexible R40 site requirements for minimum setbacks and open space, for instance, allow for a more appropriate design response when considering multiple dwelling development as dwelling density controls are replaced with plot ratio controls (i.e. controls over the total building floor space relative to site area).  The maximum plot ratio allowed for R40 coded land is 0.6 (i.e. useable building floor space on a 1,000m2 lot is 600m2, for instance, a 2 storey building that covers around 300m2 of the site).  For proposed Lot 200 the maximum allowed plot ratio area would therefore be 2,127.6m2.

 

The R-Codes will become more relevant at the development application stage where any proposal will be assessed in detail against the various design elements contained therein.

 

Broadwater Structure Plan Precinct 1

 

The Broadwater Structure Plan Precinct 1 was endorsed by the WA Planning Commission in June 2005 and has generally guided subdivision of the Broadwater area.  The Structure Plan encourages a range of residential densities to provide housing choice for residents with varying needs and requirements.  The subject lot is identified in an area of Residential R20. 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

There are no direct financial implications arising from the recommendations of this report.

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Nil.

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

The proposed amendment is considered to be consistent with the following community objective of the City’s Strategic Community Plan 2013 – 2.2          A City of shared, vibrant and well planned places that provide for diverse activity and strengthen our social connections.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

An assessment of the potential implications of implementing the Officer Recommendation has been undertaken using the City’s risk assessment framework.  The assessment identified ‘downside’ risks only, rather than upside risks as well.  The implementation of the Officer Recommendation will involve initiating the proposed scheme amendment and referring it to the Environmental Protection Authority.  In this regard, there are no significant risks identified.

 

CONSULTATION

 

There is no requirement under the Planning and Development Act 2005 to advertise a proposed scheme amendment prior to it being initiated by the Council. Accordingly, no advertising has occurred to date.

 

If the Council resolves to initiate the proposed amendment, the relevant amendment documentation would be referred to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) for consideration of the need for formal assessment under Part IV of the Environmental Protection Act 1986.  Should the EPA resolve that the amendment does not require formal assessment it will be advertised for 42 days in accordance with the Town Planning Regulations 1967.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

Appropriate opportunities to support urban consolidation are generally supported by the strategic planning framework, especially at a State level. Opportunities to provide a diversity of lot sizes and housing types in urban areas, and therefore a variety of lifestyle options, are also broadly supported.  The proposal will facilitate the redevelopment of this site in an appropriate manner, encouraging more diversity of housing products in the City of Busselton.

 

The development concept sought by the proponent cannot be accommodated under the current R20 coding of the subject lot.  The proposal will enable the controls by which the density of residential and mixed use development will be guided to be in accordance with Residential R40 as specified in the R-Codes. 

 

The proponent has provided concept plans of the proposed development (see Attachment C), which consists of 16 two-bedroom multiple dwellings.  The two-storey buildings will retain a residential scale consistent with the R40 code requirements for setbacks and plot ratio.  The proposed plot ratio area calculates at 1,667.1m2 where, as mentioned previously, the maximum allowed plot ratio area on the site would be 2,127.6m2.  The design of the development will ensure that all apartments face the adjoining streets, with the 8 units fronting Broadwater Boulevard having views of the Broadwater Wetlands.  Vehicles will access the site at one point from Bell Drive and all parking being located at the rear of the buildings will be inconspicuous from the roads.

 

That the site overlooks the Broadwater Wetlands will provide occupants of the units overlooking that area a sense of space and will also allow all occupants to utilise this area for additional recreational purposes (where possible).  The relatively large lot size (3,546m2) makes the site suitable to allow development for multiple housing purposes and the site’s proximity to Bussell Highway provides easy access to public transport.  The site is within proximity to the Busselton CBD (approximately 6.5km) and the Vasse Village Centre (under construction and approximately 4.5km) as well as the nearby Broadwater shopping complex, providing the array of services and facilities available in that centre

 

The site is therefore considered to be an acceptable location for an R40 multiple dwelling development and the proposal is considered to be consistent with the relevant planning framework.  The draft amendment is recommended to be initiated for consultation purposes.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Officers are recommending that proposed Amendment No. 16 to Local Planning Scheme No. 21 be initiated for referral to the EPA and subsequent advertising for public comment.

OPTIONS

 

Should the Council not support the Officer Recommendation, the Council could consider the following options –

 

1.            Resolve to decline the request to initiate the proposed amendment in its entirety and     provide a reason for such a decision.

 

2.            Resolve to initiate the proposed amendment subject to modification(s).

 

It should be noted that there is no right of appeal against a Council decision not to initiate an amendment.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

The implementation of the Officer Recommendation will involve the forwarding of the amendment to the Environmental Protection Authority and this will occur within one month of the resolution.

 

 

Council Decision and Officer Recommendation

C1508/219              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

1.    That the Council, in pursuance of Part V of the Planning and Development Act 2005, adopts draft Amendment No. 16 to the City of Busselton Local Planning Scheme 21 for community consultation for the purpose of rezoning portion of Lot 519 Bell Drive, Broadwater from ‘Residential R20’ to ‘Residential R40’ and amend the Scheme Map accordingly.

 

2.    That, as the draft Amendment is in the opinion of the Council consistent with Part V of the Act and Regulations made pursuant to the Act, that upon the preparation of the necessary documentation, the draft Amendment be referred to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) as required by Part V of the Act and on receipt of a response from the EPA indicating that the draft Amendment is not subject to formal environmental assessment, be advertised for a period of 42 days, in accordance with the Town Planning Regulations 1967.

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      73                                                                 12 August 2015

11.2           PROPOSED STRATEGIC PURCHASE OF LOT 40 VASSE HIGHWAY, BOVELL FOR FUTURE USE AS ACTIVE SPORTING AND RECREATION AREA (SOUTHERN EXPANSION OF SIR STEWART BOVELL PARK)

SUBJECT INDEX:

Land Acquisition/Disposal

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

A City where the community has access to quality cultural, recreation, leisure facilities and services.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Strategic Planning and Development  

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Strategic Planning and Development

REPORTING OFFICER:

Manager Strategic Planning and Development - Matthew Riordan

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Planning and Development Services - Paul Needham

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   Lot 40 Vasse Hway Long Term Financial Plan Scenario

Attachment b    Oval Configuration Concept Sketches - Southern Expansion of Bovell Park

Attachment c    Oval Configuration Concept Sketches - Bovell Park West and Lot 40 (Alternative)  

  

 

PRÉCIS

 

A timely opportunity has arisen for the City to acquire a 4 hectare ‘Agriculture’-zoned property (including an existing premises, which could be leased for residential tenancy until such time as the land is developed for active recreation purposes) abutting the southern end of Sir Stewart Bovell Park.

 

Lot 40 Vasse Highway, Bovell has been identified in the City’s adopted Active Open Space Recommendations (2013) and draft Local Planning Strategy (2013) as being within a potential strategic expansion area for major outdoor sporting and recreation facilities (effectively, the southern extension of Sir Stewart Bovell Park).  The purchase of Lot 40 could provide a valuable community investment opportunity to catalyze and facilitate the future expansion of Bovell Park in line with the City’s active open space and strategic planning objectives.

 

With the informal support of the Finance Committee, an ‘option to purchase’ (for $850,000 exclusive of GST) was submitted to the vendor, on 9 June 2015. This was duly signed and accepted on 10 June 2015.

 

The proposed purchase price is based on a sworn valuation (commissioned by the City) of $800,000, together with a 6.25% ($50,000) premium reflecting the ‘special interest’ strategic value of the property (which is private land neighbouring  an existing City-owned asset). The original ‘asking price’ for Lot 40 was $1.2 million, subsequently reduced by the vendor to $960,000.

 

After reporting the matter to the Finance Committee on 4 June 2015 - and having since completed all reasonable due diligence to inform and confirm the strategic merit of the purchase of Lot 40 - it is recommended that the Council authorize the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to formally exercise the ‘option to purchase’ (for $850,000 exclusive of GST) on behalf of the City.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

The subject property was listed on the Busselton property market in late January 2015, for an ‘asking price’ of $1.2 million.

 

Because the property was seen as a potentially valuable strategic asset that could catalyze and facilitate the future expansion of active open space facilities on Sir Stewart Bovell Park, a sworn valuation was commissioned by the City to test the market price.

 

A sworn valuation of $800,000 was returned in February 2015 (and subsequently reviewed and confirmed by the same Licenced Valuer, at the request of the City, in May 2015).

 

An initial briefing was provided to Councillors on 8 April 2015 regarding the strategic purchase of Lot 40 and support was provided for officers to initiate informal negotiations for the property. In accordance with the sworn valuation, an ‘informal offer’ of $800,000 was subsequently submitted to the vendor, in late April 2015.

 

In early May the vendor responded, agreeing to the establishment of a 4-month ‘option to purchase’ period (until 20 September 2015) for a requisite fee of $5,000 (which would be non-refundable in the event that the City did not ultimately proceed with purchase, but would be included in the purchase price if it did). The vendor dismissed the original informal ‘offer’ of $800,000, however, and advised that a (reduced) price of $960,000 would be the ‘bottom line’ figure they would entertain.

 

A report on the prospective purchase of Lot 40 was provided by officers to the CEO and senior staff on 12 May 2015 and it was agreed at that meeting that basic ‘due diligence’ in respect to the prospective purchase be initiated, and a subsequent presentation made to the Finance Committee  seeking informal support for further action to progress the matter.  

 

Following a presentation to the Finance Committee on 4 June 2015, the Committee indicated informal support for the CEO to inter into a formal ‘option to purchase’ agreement with the registered proprietor of Lot 40 on the basis of the following terms and conditions:

 

·    A purchase price of $850,000 (exclusive of GST), this being a 6.25%  increase on the sworn valuation,  reflecting its ‘special interest’ strategic value as a property  neighbouring an existing City-owned asset, and more generally reflecting the ‘premium’ that an adjoining landowner may typically be expected to pay;

·    The option to be binding on the vendor, until 20 September 2015;

·    The option to be exercised at the sole discretion of the City; and

·    The payment of an ‘option fee’ to the vendor of $5,000 (which will form part of the purchase price if the option is ultimately exercised by the City, but which is non-refundable if it is not).

 

It was recognised by the Finance Committee that the formal ‘option to purchase’ agreement will allow the City time to complete all reasonable due diligence in respect to:

 

·    financing the strategic purchase of Lot 40;

·    investigating the condition of the existing property (including the potential to lease the existing residential premises to offset potential financing costs);

·    investigating environmental site conditions;

·    investigating conceptual design layouts for the possible southern expansion of Bovell Park active recreation areas and facilities, in respect to both Lot 40 and the immediate vicinity; and

·    obtaining the formal approval of the Council for the execution of the purchase.    

 

The ‘option to purchase’ for Lot 40 submitted to the vendor by the City (for $850,000 exclusive of GST) was submitted to the vendor on 9 June 2015, and accepted and endorsed by same on 10 June 2015.

 

All reasonable due diligence has now been completed in respect to the subject property and it is recommended that the Council approve the execution of the current ‘option to purchase’ accordingly.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

The prospective purchase of Lot 40 Vasse Highway, Bovell will constitute ‘acquiring an interest in land’, as contemplated in s3.59 of the Local Government Act 1995 (the Act). However, it will not constitute a ‘major land transaction’ under the Act (see note below) and therefore will not necessitate the application of any further requirements of s3.59 (e.g. the preparation and advertisement of a ‘business plan’ concerning the development of the property prior to any purchase).

 

Note:    A ‘major land transaction’ is when the prospective purchase price of the property, together with any likely subsequent financial cost(s) associated with the future use and/or development of that particular property, is likely to be more than the statutory threshold of $2 million, or 10% of the City of Busselton’s annual operational budget, whichever is the greater. As the City’s operational budget in 2014-2015 was approximately $61 million, the threshold in terms of the Act is presently around $6.1 million. The estimated total costs associated with the purchase and likely future development of Lot 40 will be considerably less than this threshold figure. As such, the prospective purchase of Lot 40 falls outside the statutory application and requirements of s3.59 of the Act.

 

Although there is no statutory requirement to do so, the prospective purchase of Lot 40 was advertised for public notice in Council for the Community on 26 June 2015.  Public comments were invited in relation to the matter until 10 July 2015. As of that date,  no comments had been received.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

In 2013 the Council adopted ‘Active Open Space Planning Recommendations’ (AOSPR) to guide the future planning of active open space facilities in the City. This followed 18 months of consultation and needs assessments, a review of the City ‘Leisure Services Plan’ and a demographic analysis of individual population precincts across the Municipality. A ‘Hierarchy of Active Open Spaces’ was also endorsed at that time: ‘local’ (1-5 ha), ‘district’ (5-20 ha) or ‘regional’ (> 20 ha).

 

Bovell Park (20 hectares) was identified in the AOSPR as a ‘local level facility’ (sic), and land abutting to the south, including Lot 40 (effectively an extension of the existing sporting facilities at Sir Stewart Bovell Park) shown, indicatively, as part of a ‘planned potential outdoor recreation area’. The AOSPR identified this area as a possible future precinct for the expansion and development of Bovell Park into a long term ‘regional-level’ facility.  

 

Proposals in the City’s draft Local Planning Strategy (2013) support the medium term (10-15 year*) development of the ‘Urban Growth Area’ (UGA) for Bovell (see below, with Lot 40 outlined and potential future ceded land, in blue shading, shown adjoining).

 

*Note:    the future staged release of land for urban development at Bovell may be ‘brought forward’, depending on outcomes and recommendations endorsed in the adopted Local Planning Strategy and the views and aspirations of the subject landowners .

 

Although difficult to accurately assess in the absence of detailed structure planning, the developable area of the Bovell UGA could be around 210-230 hectares (dependent on environmental, drainage, heritage and other site characteristics and constraints). Given that a minimum of 10% (e.g. 21-23 hectares in this assumption) of this developable area would be required to be ceded to the Crown for public open space purposes, it would be very likely that a minimum provision of 4-6 hectares of that, for local active sporting and recreation facilities, would be required within the total Bovell UGA.

 

Given that the location has already been earmarked in both the AOSPR and the draft LPS, this provision of local active open space would logically be ceded along the southern boundary of Bovell Park. Together with Lot 40 (4 hectares), this could then provide for a combined and contiguous 8-10 hectare area for the southern expansion of Bovell Park.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

The prospective price of purchase of Lot 40 is $850,000 (exclusive of GST: because of the nature of the property and its land use, and the type of transaction proposed, it is understood that GST will not be payable).

 

Should the purchase be approved by the Council, the transaction would be required to be settled on or before the settlement date agreed on the signed ‘option to purchase’, being 7 October 2015.

 

In terms of section 6.20(1) and (2) of the Act, a local government:

·    May borrow money; and

·    Has to give one month’s public notice of its intention to borrow money and exercise that power by absolute majority, unless details of a proposal to borrow money have been included in its annual budget for that financial year.

 

In respect to the budgeted funding of any approved oval and facilities construction on Lot 40, estimated to be between $1.5-2 million, the following actions are recommended (l along with sourcing grants funding from the Department of Sports and Recreation’s Community Sports and Recreation Facilities Fund):

 

·    The investigation of a potential ‘re-allocation’ of developer contribution funds from the Yalyalup DCSP (2010), most notably in respect to a re-assessment of the scale, scope and level of funds historically allocated for the construction of a ‘multi-purpose community centre’. Any formal consideration of this would require a draft amendment to the DCSP, formal public consultation, and the approval of the WAPC.

·    An identification of other, existing and future development contributions funds that can be used to meet both the costs associated with acquiring the land, but also potential costs associated with its development for the intended purpose.

·    A review of the overall City of Busselton Developer Contribution Plan (2008), the findings and recommendations of which will be incorporated into Local Planning Scheme 21.  

 

Long-term Financial Plan (LTFP) Implications

 

It is proposed to finance the purchase of Lot 40 with an interest only, 10-year loan.

 

An LTFP scenario for Lot 40 has been prepared at Attachment A, outlining the net amounts the City will need to budget for each year in order to meet repayments. It should be noted that the LTFP scenario reflects certain ‘assumptions’ - such as (e.g.) development of the property will not occur for ten years and thus rental incomes will continue apace (etc), and the scenario does not provide for the actual development of the land for the intended purpose, notwithstanding that City officers consider it quite likely that the City will have both the capacity and the need to develop the land for recreational purposes within the LTFP timeframe.

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

The recommendations of this Report reflect Community Objective 2.1 of the City’s ‘Strategic Community Plan 2013’, viz:

 

2.1          A City where the community has access to quality cultural, recreation, leisure facilities and services. 

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

An assessment of the potential implications of implementing the Officer Recommendation has been undertaken using the City’s risk assessment framework. The assessment identifies ‘downside’ risks only, rather than ‘upside’ risks as well. Risks are only identified where the residual risk, once controls are identified, is ‘medium’ or greater.

 

Risk

Controls

Consequence

Likelihood

Risk Level

Financial risk: If, after Lot 40 being purchased, the property was subsequently found to have characteristics detrimental to its timely or optimum development for active open space (e.g. significant site contamination, or unforeseen environmental impacts or legislative restrictions), or limiting its viability in terms of interim ‘offset income’ (e.g. issues associated with the successful residential leasing of the existing premises)

 

Routine site assessments; upkeep of management and maintenance requirements of property.

Minor

Possible

Medium

Financial risk: Not being able to assemble and coordinate the necessary funding and resources to implement the timely southern expansion of Bovell Park into Lot 40 and/or adjoining land to be ceded from the Bovell UGA

Comprehensive review of the City of Busselton Developer Contribution Plan (2008); identification and timely allocation of developer contribution funds; applications for grants funding.  

Moderate

Possible

Medium

Financial risk: Not being able to coordinate and allocate appropriate strategic funds to repay the loan principal, when it becomes due after 10 years

Strategic consideration in the  review of City of Busselton Developer Contribution Plan (2008)  

Moderate

Unlikely

Medium

 

CONSULTATION

 

Although there was no statutory requirement to do so, the prospective purchase of Lot 40 was advertised for public notice in Council for the Community on 26 June 2015.  Public comments were invited, over a period of 14 days, in relation to the matter. At the end of that period (on 10 July 2015), no public comments had been received.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

City officers have conducted all reasonable DUE DILIGENCE on the subject property and existing residence at Lot 40 Vasse Highway required to inform and confirm the strategic planning merit and financial sustainability of the prospective purchase. This has included:

 

·    a ‘desktop search’ through Landgate;

·    a site inspection (on 22 May 2015) by the Senior Environment Officer, the Community Development Coordinator and the Manager Strategic Planning;

·    an examination of possible constraints and implications for active open space development in regard to the existing drainage channel and service/utility lines between Bovell Park and Lot 40; and

·    a property condition report (from commissioned inspections by qualified contractors) for the existing dwelling and curtilage, including septic tanks and water supply/storage.

 

Importantly, there was no obvious evidence of site contamination (asbestos, chemicals, scrap iron, fuel etc.) identified, either in desktop Landgate data, or revealed during the physical inspection of Lot 40 in May 2015.

 


 

The results of the DUE DILIGENCE investigations undertaken by officers are outlined below.

 

1.      Environment and Habitat

 

The vegetation on Lot 40 consists of mature to senescent Peppermint, Flooded Gum and Marri trees which are a remnant of the Eucalyptus rudis, Corymbia calophylla, Agonis flexuosa Closed Low Forest vegetation complex that would have existed on the property prior to European settlement. This is a Priority 1 vegetation community; however, as the trees are the only remaining plants and the understorey has been completely replaced with pasture, the vegetation unit has very little conservation value from a vegetation community perspective.

The trees on the property are very old and large and, as such, potentially provide habitat (nesting hollows and food) for fauna, including ‘Threatened’ fauna such as the Western Ringtail Possum (WRP). Some evidence of WRP was found in two of the largest Peppermint trees on Lot 40 during site inspection.

 

The Federal Department of Environment has categorized land in the subject area as ‘Primary Corridor’, which means it is an area where WRP habitat has largely been removed but, because of the soil types and proximity to other habitat areas, it nevertheless has remaining potential to provide connectivity between other areas of core habitat, thereby improving opportunities for dispersal.

Over time, the objective would be to consolidate the existing habitat in this locality and introduce additional high quality habitat to replace that lost from the area.  This means that provision should be made in any future plans for the extension southwards of Bovell Park for a ‘vegetation corridor’ linking existing and potential future patches of remnant vegetation.

 

In respect to Lot 40, the following illustration indicates where vegetation linkages could be retained/introduced to address the objectives of the Federal Department of Environment’s ‘Significant Impact Guidelines’ objectives in any recognised primary corridor area:

 

Under current environmental legislation and guidelines, ithere are not expected to be any major impediments to, or cost-prohibitive procedural requirements generated by, the clearing of any remnant vegetation on Lot 40 to facilitate the future southern expansion of Bovell Park. Clearing  could, however, result in the (albeit very limited) loss of WRP habitatand it is recognised that linkages for WRP movement and dispersal may  be required in this locality – including as part of the planning and development of the Bovell UGA (regardless of whether the City acquires Lot 40 at this stage, or not).

 


 

2.      Active Open Space Development ‘Scenarios’ (Expansion / re-development of Bovell Park) 

 

In order to consider the practical benefits and strategic merit of the purchase of Lot 40, especially in relation to any potential future expansion southwards of Bovell Park, several schematic design layouts were developed by Officers to illustrate feasible alternatives for the consolidation and integration of contiguous active open space areas.

 

These schematic design layouts are shown at Attachment B and show:

 

1.    The potential development of Lot 40 – showing viability of ovals, access, car-parking and with the existing house remaining;

2.    The potential development of Lot 40 – showing viability of ovals, access, car-parking and with existing house removed; and

3.    The potential development of Lot 40 and adjoining land to be potentially ceded through the future urban growth and development of Bovell – being the southern expansion of Bovell Park showing possible layout of ovals, access, car-parking and with existing house removed.

 

A further design layout was prepared to demonstrate that the southern expansion of Bovell Park could be consolidated effectively and efficiently with newly master-planned active open space development along the existing western flank of Bovell Park. This is depicted at Attachment C.

 

Also shown on Attachment C is an alternative oval layout on Lot 40, illustrating a further option utilizing existing access at the south-eastern corner of Bovell Park and providing a carriageway across the open drainage channel (which would be filled and piped) to car parking facilities. Existing servicing locations along the common boundary between Bovell Park and Lot 40 are also indicated.

 

These servicing locations are discussed below.

 

3.      Servicing Locations (Design / Development Implications)

 

Power transmission lines:

 

Overhead power transmission lines cross into the south-eastern corner of Bovell Park from Vasse Highway, to provide power to the existing hockey club facilities. In order to enable a contiguous extension of grassed open space from Bovell Park southwards into Lot 40, it would be necessary to remove these lines and ‘underground’ that power supply connection. 

 

Western Power has advised that to remove the existing transmission lines and install a new ground mount transformer on the boundary (such that underground power could be connected into it to supply the hockey club facilities) would cost in the order of $80,000.

 

To trench and install underground the power supply to service the hockey club facilities, in place of the overhead transmission lines, is estimated (internally) to cost around $15-20,000; meaning a potential total cost of around $100,000 to introduce underground power to enable the unfettered strategic expansion of active open space in that vicinity.

 

High Pressure Sewer Main:  

 

A high pressure sewer main runs along the northern side of the open drainage channel at the southern boundary of Bovell Park, connecting the Country Road Estate and residential development east of Vasse Highway at Yalyalup. This sewer main is protected by an easement across the City-owned property (Bovell Park).

 

Informal advice from the Water Corporation has suggested that there would be no significant issue with the City constructing grassed sporting areas, and even a vehicular access carriageway (e.g. as shown in alternative oval layout for Lot 40 at Attachment B), across this high pressure sewer main.

 

Access for heavy vehicles, such as trucks, or the construction of car parking or buildings on or across the sewer main, would NOT be likely to be supported by the WC. This would be because of the need to protect the structural integrity of the main and ensure unrestricted maintenance access to the main, if and as required.

 

In terms of accommodating prospective oval expansion layouts in the subject part of Bovell Park, the Water Corporation would need to relocate an existing scouring pit to prevent interference with oval construction and active use. The estimated cost of the scouring pit removal, backfill and compacting would be approximately $3,000.   

 

Drainage Channel 

 

There are options available to contend with the existing physical ‘barrier’ imposed by the open drainage channel along the southern boundary of Bovell Park: for example, the channel could be diverted around the southern expansion areas (Lot 40 and adjoining land to potentially be ceded as part of the future structure planning and urban development of the Bovell UGA).

 

Preferably, however, the drainage channel (which accepts runoff from the current Bovell Park development) would be filled in and levelled, with piped sub-surface drainage introduced and ‘married in’ to oval construction and development works in the future. The cost of doing this would be incorporated into the detailed engineering design and budgeted works costs of future oval construction.    

 

Water Supply

 

The current groundwater allocation and bore capacity in the operational control of the City at Bovell Park will readily service an expansion of all active open space areas and facilities mooted within this report; both within the existing Bovell Park, and within any prospective future (8-10 hectare) southern expansion of Bovell Park southwards.    

 

4.         Property Condition Report

 

A series of assessments of the condition, security and safety of the existing residential premises and curtilage on Lot 40 was commissioned by the City in July 2015. The resultant inspections involved reporting on structural engineering, termites and pests, electrical, and plumbing (including septic tanks and potable water supply/storage), and has been summarized below:  

 

Note:     Smoke alarms and Residual Current Devices are required, under State Government          Regulations, to be installed (and to meet ‘deemed to satisfy provisions’) by settlement of any            acquisition. 

 

A.     Structural engineering (Cotan Pty Ltd)

 

Concluded that the residence on Lot 40 is ‘structurally sound’ with roof framing observed to be in good condition and roof cladding recently installed. There were issues identified during inspection, however, that were recommended as requiring rectification.

 

 

 

 

These were:

 

·   Asbestos             

 

External wall cladding is Hardieplank and eaves lining is Hardieflex. Asbestos was ‘phased out’ in these products from 1981 onwards (residence constructed circa 1978). It is difficult to determine from visual inspection if these contain asbestos or not. The safest course of action is to assume that they do and ensure that all fibro products are painted to seal in fibres, should they exist, prior to letting out the premises.

 

Some external barge capping is asbestos and caution should be taken if working in wet areas where asbestos containing Versilux and Tilux may have been used.

 

·   Termite Ingress                

 

Termite ingress has occurred in the residence, with some damage to plasterboard and windows observed. ‘Exterra’ termite bait boxes have been fixed to walls in lounge room and also externally.

 

There was no evidence of live termite activity, although this is difficult to judge by visual inspection due to paving areas built to level of bottom of Hardiflex cladding and garden beds in places elevated above the height of the bottom of the cladding. This, together with downpipes discharging directly onto the ground alongside the building (gutters blocked with leaves and overflowing), result in moist soil conditions and ideal entry points for termites.

 

Recommended continuing baiting program, reduction of garden beds to perimeter of building (to at least 150mm below bottom edge of wall cladding), down pipes to be piped away to discharge water well clear of building. Lowering of paved areas to provide visual separation between ground level and bottom of cladding also recommended, but this may be more cost restrictive. 

 

·   Cracks and Water Damage to Ceilings

Maintenance works recommended to screw ceiling lining to timber joists, repaint etc. Aesthetic more than structural issues. No evidence that previous roof leaks still exist (roof re-cladded in recent years) and no structural members in roof at risk.

 

·   Timber Fascias

Some timber fascias, whilst not structural elements, are in poor condition and should be replaced. Others require re-painting to prevent the ingress of moisture.

 

·   Insulation 

Roof sheeting and internal ceiling frame are uninsulated, as are masonry walls and verandah ceiling lining.    

 

B.     Visual Termite Inspection (in accordance with AS 3660.2-2000) (Busselton Pest Control)

 

Inspection revealed that building has had termite intrusion in skirting of front bedroom and walls in loungeroom. Visual above ground ‘Exterra’ stations evident and monitoring and maintenance of these recommended. Water release areas alongside or near the building (down pipes, hot water heater etc) need to be drained away / kept moisture-free as wet areas are highly conducive to termite activity. No live insect termite activity observed during inspection. 

 


 

C.     Plumbing and Gas (Ambergate Plumbing)

 

All domestic gas and water fixtures and functionality in good order. Septic tank levels normal. Well pump working normally. Recommend testing water potability as sourced from well. 

 

D.     Electrical (Rob Mildwaters Electrical)

 

The property electrical installation is generally in good condition and compliant in regard to RCD and Smoke Detection devices. Power supply to shed has been disconnected. Non-compliancy issues, essentially minor, were assessed as follows:

 

·   A general purpose outlet (GPO) located over stove top is prohibited and should be moved;

·   All ceiling join conduits should be housed in an approved junction box;

·   Pump cover and electric fence unit are sub-standard;

·   Earth stakes to main switch board should be verified as being fully compliant.

 

5.         Summary of DUE DILIGENCE

 

In undertaking all reasonable due diligence in relation to the prospective purchase of Lot 40, it was observed that:

 

·   there is no clear evidence of any site contamination (asbestos, chemicals, scrap iron, fuel etc);

·   there are no environmental constraints affecting the property that cannot be readily addressed as part of normal planning procedures;

·   the relocation/undergrounding of overhead transmission lines in the south-east corner of Bovell Park, to accommodate the southern expansion and future optimum development of active open space facilities into Lot 40, could be achieved for an estimated total cost of $100,000;

·   the reconfiguration (piping, filling, levelling, redesign as sub-surface drainage etc) of the open drainage channel forming the current boundary between Bovell Park and Lot 40 could be accommodated as part of the future design and funding of oval development on Lot 40;

·   there are no other obvious impediments or constraints to the future southern expansion of Bovell Park;   

·   the existing premises on Lot 40 are essentially structurally sound and functional, although certain rectification and improvement works identified in due diligence inspections should be carried out by the City ahead of securing a long-term residential tenancy (until such time as Lot 40 is ready for development and the premises are removed). The estimated likely costs of these works has not been calculated, although will not be substantial in the overall context of the proposed acquisition.

 

Strategic Funding

 

As part of investigations into sourcing strategic funding to finance the future planning and development of Lot 40, and the corresponding southern expansion of the active open space facilities on Bovell Park, it is recommended that a comprehensive review of the ‘City of Busselton Developer Contributions Plan (2008)’ be conducted. Part of that review would entail identifying funds that can be allocated from existing holdings in addition to expected fuitre income in line with existing policy, the other key part is a broader review, examining potential future needs and funding, and amending policies to reflect that review. Along with that process, an investigation into the potential ‘re-allocation’ of developer contribution funds from the Yalyalup DCSP (2010) - most notably in respect to a re-assessment of the scale, scope and level of funds historically allocated for the construction of a ‘multi-purpose community centre’ - could be undertaken.

 

In accordance with discussions with the Finance Committee, City Officers will also investigate the best ways and means of funding the lump-sum (re)payment of the principal loan sourced to finance the strategic acquisition of Lot 40. This lump sum repayment will be due 10 years from the date of settlement of the property transaction.

 

Strategic Planning

 

Several strategic planning matters relevant to the acquisition of Lot 40 and the future southern expansion of the active recreation facilities at Sir Stewart Bovell Park, will be (or will continue to be) considered and investigated by Officers, including (but not limited to):

 

1.         The timely provision and location of active open space resources to service the neighbouring Yalyalup urban growth area; which could have a potential residential population of > 7,000 people and resultant need for the provision of two x senior ovals (only one oval has been provided in current structure planning);

2.         The potential ‘early ceding’ of the 4-6 hectare parcel of land (previously discussed in this report) adjoining the western boundary of Lot 40 and the southern boundary of Bovell Park; including liaison with the landowners about future intentions and aspirations for their properties;

3.         The relationship of Bovell Park with those potential recreational facilities shown in the endorsed Active Open Space Recommendations (2013) at Rendezvous Road (the development of which is likely to be in the longer term, compared to the prospective development for regional-level facilities at Bovell Park).       

 

It is worth noting that Bovell Park is the only existing City recreational facility that is adjoined by potentially acquirable and developable land and, as such, other than the Rendezvous Road site or another entirely new site, is the only location where recreational facilities could be developed at a ‘regional scale’. The securing of Lot 40 is a very important, if not vital, element of being able to expand and develop Bovell Park.

 

CONCLUSION

 

A timely opportunity has arisen for the City to acquire a 4 hectare, ‘Agriculture’-zoned property (including an existing premises which could be leased out for residential tenancy) abutting the southern end of Sir Stewart Bovell Park.

 

Lot 40 Vasse Highway, Bovell has been identified in the City’s adopted Active Open Space Recommendations (2013) and draft Local Planning Strategy (2013) as being within a potential strategic expansion area for major outdoor sporting and recreation facilities (effectively, the extension southwards of Bovell Park).

 

After informally  discussing the matter with  the Finance Committee on 4 June 2015, and having since completed all reasonable due diligence to inform and confirm the strategic merit and value of Lot 40, it is now recommended that the Council authorize the Chief Executive Officer to formally exercise the current ‘option to purchase’ that has been accepted by the vendor (for $850,000 exclusive of GST) on behalf of the City.      

 

OPTIONS

 

Should the Council NOT support the prospective purchase of Lot 40 Vasse Highway, for $850,000 (exclusive of GST), it could potentially:

 

A)   Support a lesser amount being offered by the City for the purchase of the subject property; or

B)    ‘Defer’ the strategic initiative to purchase, at this time, the subject property for future planned development and use by the City as active open space (through the southern extension of Bovell Park).

 

In respect to A), a revised ‘option to purchase’ would need to be negotiated with the vendor, with no certainty that this would be accepted (were this to prove to be the case, the prospective purchase could fail and the requisite ‘option fee’ of $5,000 be forfeited.)

 

In respect to B), the City would be obliged to withdraw the current ‘option to purchase’ and forfeit the ‘option fee’ of $5,000.

 

In both scenarios, the future southern expansion of Bovell Park - to facilitate the potential staged extension of local- and district-level active open space facilities into a regional-level asset - would be either ‘postponed’ in a strategic sense (making it more difficult to coordinate and secure at a later stage), or be effectively ‘discounted’ as a strategic option.   

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

Should the Council support the Officer Recommendation, the City’s Legal Services Coordinator will coordinate the purchase of the property by the City, on or before the settlement date agreed on the current ‘option to purchase’ (being 7 October 2015).    

 

Council Decision and Officer Recommendation

C1508/220              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council resolve to:

 

1.            Exercise the ‘option to purchase’ entered into by the City for the acquisition of Lot 40 Vasse Highway, Bovell (for future development and use as an active sporting and recreation area within a southern expansion of Sir Stewart Bovell Park) for $850,000 exclusive of GST; and

 

2.            Undertake a comprehensive review of the ‘City of Busselton Developer Contributions Plan (2008)’; including prospective funding and development of active open space facilities in a contiguous (8-10 hectare, including Lot 40) southern expansion of Sir Stewart Bovell Park, and the payment of the loan principal associated with acquisition of Lot 40.

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      87                                                                 12 August 2015

11.4           PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO LOCAL PLANNING POLICY 4B - URBAN CENTRES POLICY: PORT GEOGRAPHE VILLAGE CENTRE - DESIGN GUIDELINES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS AND PRECINCT PLAN - CONSIDERATION OF ADOPTION FOR FINAL APPROVAL

SUBJECT INDEX:

Planning Scheme

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

A City of shared, vibrant and well planned places that provide for diverse activity and strengthen our social connections.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Development Services and Policy

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Planning and Development Services

REPORTING OFFICER:

Manager, Development Services - Anthony Rowe

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Planning and Development Services - Paul Needham

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Nil

  

 

PRÉCIS

 

The City at its meeting OF 27 May 2015 resolved to adopt for advertising an amendment to Local Planning Policy – 4B Urban Centres Policy "Port Geographe Village Centre – Design Guidelines and Performance Standards” to expand the village area to encompass all ‘titled’ allotments.

 

A revised precinct map was advertised ON 12 and 19 June 2015 and no submissions were received during the consultation period (which ended on 3 July 2015). 

 

No changes are recommended to the proposed policy amendment as advertised, which is now presented with the recommendation that the Council adopt the changes for final approval.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Port Geographe Village Precinct Plan covers a discrete area bound by the coast, Layman Road and Keel Retreat.

 

The Local Planning Policy – 4B Urban Centres Policy "Port Geographe Village Centre – Design Guidelines and Performance Standards provides development principles for the Precinct that includes the Village Centre core, grouped dwelling areas, tourist accommodation, resort village, boat launching and marina, core residential and non-core residential.

 

The development of the Precinct, in accord with the original intent, had relied upon a combination of planning controls and the enforcement of covenants by the developer.

 

Within the Port Geographe Village Centre Precinct Plan, the “core residential” policies reflected the provisions that are found in the covenants applying generally within the Port Geographe area.  Conversely, the Non-Core Residential Development relied on the covenants in addition to the R-Codes. 

 

“4.8.3 Non-Core Residential Development

For Village Centre residential lots outside the Village Centre Core, development is only subject to the provisions of the Residential Design Codes and the Shire’s Planning Scheme.”

 

Due to the protracted period that has occurred with the development of Port Geographe, there has not been an overall developer responsible throughout the development of the lots or the enforcement of the covenants, which sought an integrated character for Port Geographe.  This has left allotments not in the Non-Core Residential Development up to the community to enforce, and approval of development subject to compliance with the R-Codes only, which does allow for development which is inconsistent with the covenants. 

 

Community enforcement of the covenants is accepted to be difficult and not practical.

 

For this reason Council has responded to the community concern, to align the Local Planning Policy to ensure planning decisions align with the covenants.  In this sense, to align the planning decisions to the Covenant is not an additional imposition upon the property owner, as the original condition of purchase through the Covenant, registered on title and acknowledged on any subsequent purchase, is passed to all subsequent owners.

 

The Local Planning Policy effective as of 17 April 2015, now consistent with the covenant as it affects buildings, reads as;

“4.8 Residential (8)

In order to establish a distinct architectural hierarchy to the Village Centre Precinct, all residential development within the area of the Village Centre Precinct Map requires planning approval, pursuant to cl.9.2(b)(ix) of the City of Busselton Local Planning Scheme 21.

In principle, development should conform with the following :

(a)    The Residential Design Codes of Western Australia (R-Codes) are applicable, including the granting of discretion where warranted to meet the objectives for the Village Centre.

(b)    Ground floor walls should be of masonry construction.

(c)    Upper level walls should be of masonry construction or a rendered cement appearance with the use of lightweight (e.g. timber) cladding or feature panels or elements for up to 50% of the upper level wall surface.

(d)    Garages, carports and outbuildings should be consistent in construction and finish with the ground floor of the house.

(e)    Garages and cross overs should make up no more than 50% of the width of the frontage of the site, or 7m in width where the frontage is less than 12m in width.

(f)     Roofs should be of clay or concrete tile, or Colorbond metal with feature details in timber or fibrous cement sheet.

(g)    Roofs to garages, carports and outbuildings should be consistent in roof pitch and materials with the house.

(h)    Building heights will be subject to clause 5.8 of the City of Busselton Local Planning Scheme 21. The reference to the mean high water mark means the mean high water mark of Geographe Bay.

(i)     Uniform fencing of limestone material or similar is to be provided at the POS interface.

(j)     The underside of any decks, at ground floor level, should be enclosed.

(k)    Retaining walls, facing the canal should be terraced with no face, greater than 1.2m high between steps. Any storage lockers should not protrude above the terrace or ground level.

(l)     Side fencing should not protrude forward of the building setback from a public road.”

 

The Port Geographe Development Plan Area, is the SAR area, and is an area greater than the Centre precinct alone.  Within the SAR area there are a number of residential allotments that have been created with the same covenants as the core residential development area within the Centre precinct.  A number of allotments within the SAR area are still vacant. 

 

The Council at its meeting of 27 May 2015 determined it would extend the effect of the Local Planning Policy to incorporate all the titled residential lots within the area identified by the Port Geographe Development Plan (SAR area).  It considered all residential allotments are important in framing the character of the Village Centre.  It also considered that this should be of neutral effect upon any owner following their obligation to the covenant placed upon the land.

 

The advantage of this approach is to achieve consistency between planning and the obligation bestowed by the covenant on the land title.  It does not affect the land that was subject to ‘administration’ and now awaits a revised concept design by the new owner.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

Local Planning Scheme 21 enables the City to create Local Planning Policy to provide guidance on development requirements.  Local Planning Policy cannot contradict the Scheme, and the Scheme cannot contradict State Policy (including the R-Codes) unless approved by the Minister.

 

The Scheme provides an opportunity at cl.9.2 (b)(ix), to capture single houses to require planning approval instead of being routinely Permitted – not requiring planning approval.

 

The Local Planning Policy – 4B Urban Centres Policy "Port Geographe Village Centre – Design Guidelines and Performance Standards”, including the precinct map has been advertised.

 

The next steps are:

 

1.    Consideration of submissions;

 

2.    Determination to adopt the Policy with or without modification;

 

3.    Because of the requirements of Part 7 of the R-Codes, forwarding the policy change to the WAPC for their consideration;

 

4.    Publish a notice of the adopted policy (The operation commences on publication of the notice); and

 

5.    If the WAPC advises that the policy does require their approval and they are not willing to approve the policy in the form adopted by the Council, City officers will refer the matter back to the Council for further consideration.

 

With respect to the issue of whether or not WAPC approval is required, City officers have spent some considerable time trying to determine whether or not that is necessary, and have not been able to fully resolve the question on the basis of the information available. It is likely that the question may not be entirely resolved until such time as changes to State planning regulations come into effect, which, if implemented in their proposed form, would clearly create a situation whereby WAPC approval is required. City officers are, however, are of the view that it is reasonably arguable that is currently not the case. As such, it is recommended that the Council adopt the policy for final approval and merely send a copy of the Policy to the WAPC for its information. If the WAPC is of the view that their approval is required and advises the City of the reasons why, the City can then further consider the matter.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

This report addresses proposed changes to policy – there are no other plans or policies especially relevant to consideration of this issue.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Nil.

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

Nil

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

The recommendation of this report reflects Community Objective 2.2 of the Strategic Community Plan 2013, which is: “A City of shared, vibrant and well planned places that provide for diverse activity and strengthen our social connections.”

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

An assessment of the potential implications of implementing the Officer Recommendation has been undertaken using the City’s risk assessment framework. The assessment identified ‘downside’ risks only; rather than upside risks as well, and risks are only identified where the residual risk, once controls are identified, is ‘medium’ or greater.

 

CONSULTATION

 

The proposal was advertised on 12 and 19 June 2015 closing 3 July 2015. No submissions were received.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

Since the initial consideration of the effectiveness of development control in the area of Port Geographe, by Council on 25 January 2015, the City has received enquiries about the relocation of existing buildings sourced from more central locations in Busselton.  The incentive for renewal of housing stock in the City Centre is providing a stock of buildings for relocation, if not demolished.  Unfortunately, some of these buildings are not consistent with the expected character or amenity of Port Geographe.  It is unlikely a good building will be demolished to make way for one of these relocated buildings.  It is therefore, only likely to occur at vacant lots and the City’s other estates Provence, Vasse, and Broadwater all have restricting covenants.

 

There are factors that make Port Geographe a target for these buildings.  The land, has a high coastal amenity (attractive for establishing a holiday home), and the potential for capital gain/speculation is also attractive.  There is an incentive to get a return from a cheap building, which can then be disposed of later when the land price has increased significantly.  In the meantime, for the general community, the character of the area as sought by the covenants, is undermined as the covenants are not practical for the community to enforce.

 

CONCLUSION

 

The proposed policy aligns the matters to be considered as part of a planning assessment with the obligations imposed upon the owner of land within the Port Geographe area that is subject to covenant.  The policy will therefore assist to achieve the expectations of the general community in Port Geographe.

 

The amendment to Local Planning Policy – 4B Urban Centres Policy "Port Geographe Village Centre – Design Guidelines and Performance Standards" advertised on 12 and 19 June 2015 is consistent with Clause 6.9.4 (g) in the preparation of policy affecting Port Geographe.  The draft amendment to Local Planning Policy – 4B has been prepared in accordance with Part 2 of Scheme 21.

 

OPTIONS

 

1.    Adopt

2.    Adopt subject to amendment responding to a submission

3.    Decline

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

If adopted the proposed policy will be advertised as being adopted and come into effect within two weeks.

 

Council Decision and Officer Recommendation

C1508/221              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

Tha                  1.That the Council, pursuant to clause 2.3.2 of the City of Busselton Local Planning                                Scheme 21, adopts the following amendments to Local Planning Policy 4: Urban                                            Centres Policy – 4B Port Geographe Village Centre Design Guidelines and                                          Performance Standards and Precinct Plan -

 

             i).   Delete the Village Centre Precinct Plan and replace with a new Village Centre       Precinct Plan (Attached) illustrating all titled residential allotments and designating             these allotments as “8”; to be affected by the policies assigned to “8 Residential“ in       the Local Planning Policy.

 

 

ii).        Delete clause 4.8(a) in the Local Planning Policy and replace with:

 

“(a)    The Residential Design Codes of Western Australia (R-Codes) apply with exception of items (b) to (l) where, in the event of any conflict with the R – Codes, these items will prevail.”

 

  

2.Forward the adopted policy to the West Australian Planning Commission for its information.

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

  


Council                                                                                      93                                                                 12 August 2015

12.             Engineering and Works Services Report

12.3           UPGRADE OF RURAL SINGLE LANE LINKAGE ROADS

SUBJECT INDEX:

Asset Management

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

Transport options that provide greater links within our district and increase capacity for community participation.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Engineering and Facilities Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Asset Management

REPORTING OFFICER:

Asset Coordinator - Dan Hall

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Engineering and Works Services - Oliver Darby

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Attachment a   Map Rural Single Lane Seal Roads

Attachment b    List of Rural Single Lane Seal Roads

Attachment c    Width Standards Modelling  

  

PRÉCIS

 

The purpose of this report is to update the Council on the current condition and total kilometers of rural single lane seal roads, what the priorities are within this group of roads and timelines for the renewal of these priority rural single lane seal roads.

 

The report provides details and outcomes of modelling undertaken in relation to renewal of these priority rural single lane seal roads and recommends that a renewal program specific to the priority rural single lane seal roads, funded from existing and predicted road funding; be implemented over a period of six years.

 

The report also recommends that in order to undertake the required priority rural single lane seal roads renewal works; that the Council introduce a funding split of 60% rural (single lane seal roads) and 40% towards other minimum renewal requirements. These minimum renewal requirements being, worst condition urban roads, second coat seals and gravel re-sheets.

 

The funding split does not apply to funds associated with Regional Road Group funded projects, but will be applied to other sources of funding including Direct Grants, Roads to Recovery, City general road funding and City funded Road Asset Renewal Reserve.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Rural single lane seal roads were first identified as a priority area in December 2012. Staff presented a report to the Council on the condition assessment and renewal program for rural single lane seal roads.

 

The report outlined that a large amount of road improvements were carried out in the 1960s, when State and Federal Government funding was made available to seal lengths of existing gravel roads. A majority of these roads were sealed to a width of 3.6m, which was deemed adequate at the time, but no longer conforms to current road width standards.

 

The result of this work carried out in the 1960’s was that the City now had some eighty two kilometers of rural single lane seal roads with an average seal age of twenty one years and nearing the end of its useful life. Twenty five years being the predicted average useful life for a seal within the City of Busselton.

 

The report also noted that maintenance costs on these narrow seal roads were indicatively very high, as both the seal edges and the gravel shoulders wear out more than on full width sealed roads, as the shoulders on the narrow seal roads get exposed to more traffic.

Also, the ever increasing number of tourists, most of which are not familiar with the peculiar requirements of driving on narrow sealed roads was raised as an issue. They had now reached a point in their life cycles whereby they were need of reconstruction or some other forms of remedial action.

 

The report recommended that a specific budget program be implemented to upgrade these roads on an annual basis. At a recent briefing session the Council agreed in principle, however requested more detail including; a recommended program for the first five years showing road name, distances, description of works and estimated costs. Council also requested details on how the program was to be funded and details of possible alternative sources of funding.

 

Throughout March and April 2013, a series of asset management workshops were held with the Council (through the Finance Committee) regarding the development of the Local Roads Asset Management Plan (LRAMP) (as well as asset plans for Buildings and Parks and Gardens).

 

The workshop process highlighted the need for the rural single lane seal roads to be assessed and funded in conjunction with all other roads and not as a separate program. To this end, it was decided that the need for a specific funding program for single lane seal country roads would be superseded by the outcomes of the overall LRAMP due to be completed in June 2013.

 

At the Special Council Meeting held on 26th June 2013 the Council adopted the Overall Asset Management Plan and Individual Asset Management Plans for roads, buildings and parks and gardens. These were adopted as supporting documents for the Corporate Business Plan 2013, and endorsed the Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP) 2013/14 – 2022/23 and Workforce Plan.

 

Rural Single Lane Seal Roads

 

The LRAMP provided detail on the rural single lane seal roads and identified a priority list of roads; considered to be the most essential for renewal works within the first ten years of the plan. These priorities were based on location and linkage provided within the overall network, traffic volumes, school bus routes, tourism factors and condition.

 

The roads listed as priority roads in 2013 were; Boallia Road, Hairpain Road, North Jindong Road, Tom Cullity Drive, Puzey Road, Yelverton Road and Wonnerup South Road.

 

Single lane Seal sections of Yoongarillup, Chapman Hill and Don Road have since been added to this list on the basis of providing network linkage in line with the other priority roads. These were added during the 2015 review as outlined within this report. This updated list is detailed below.

 

The roads are also shown in map format in Attachment A. this provides a visual representation of the linkage that the priority roads provide within the overall network.

 

Table 1: Priority Rural Single Lane Seal Roads

 

Road Name

Priority Sections

of Single Lane Seal

Km

TOM CULLITY DRIVE

1.9

PUZEY ROAD

4.5

YELVERTON ROAD

4.7

NORTH JINDONG ROAD

4.4

YOONGARILLUP ROAD

3.1

BOALLIA ROAD

5.3

WONNERUP SOUTH ROAD

5.0

HAIRPIN ROAD

5.1

Chapman Hill

1.6

Don Road

4.9

Total Kilometers

37.5

 

From the original list developed in 2013, the renewal works scheduled by the 2013 AMP included renewal of around 17km of rural single lane seal roads for the first seven years of the plan (2013/14 – 2019/20). Major renewal works undertaken to date include sections of Abbeys Farm Road and Puzey Road as the initial renewal of the Rural Single Lane Seal  Roads

 

The updated list of priority rural single lane seal roads currently sits at 37.5 km in length, 45% of the overall kilometres of single lane seal roads.  The overall list of rural single lane seal roads is shown in Attachment B.

 

Road Asset Management Funding

 

In addition to the Asset Management Plans, the Council endorsed the development of the Road Asset Renewal Policy detailing the mechanics of administering and accounting for the funding for Roads with their subsequent expenditure.

 

The policy was reflected in the endorsement of the Long Term Financial Plan 2013/14 – 2022/23 with the implementation of an additional rate increase of one per cent (1%) for the first six (6) years of the plan (commencing in 2013/14), for the purpose of funding the LRAMP requirements.

 

The Road Asset Renewal Policy (Policy 026) was adopted by the Council on 24/7/2013 (ref C1307/193), with rural single lane seal roads being eligible for funding under the terms of the policy.

 

2015 Local Roads Asset Management Plan and Roads Funding Policy Review

 

The policy and the asset management plan have now been in place since 2013/14. With this in mind,  a review has been conducted on the progress of the plan; measuring it against the predicted expenditure outcomes of the LTFP as well as the effectiveness and criticality of the type, extent and location of the works being undertaken. The review and update of the original list of priority rural single lane seal roads was undertaken at this time also.

 

The Review measured predicted expenditure for overall road renewal (set by the LRAMP in 2013) against actual budget exp. for the financial years 2013/14 – 2015/16. This was undertaken as a means of measuring predicted against actual over the first three years of the LRAMP

 

The chart below shows the raw asset management figures in the green columns (when the works theoretically fall due according to condition and associated factors), and how these works have been scheduled over a ten year period (blue columns) to provide a realistic and achievable schedule of works to be followed. The key to this chart is to ensure that the red column matches the blue column in any given year. The red column is the actual raised through each year’s budget process.

 


 

Chart 1 Review Roads Predicted Measured Against Actual

 

 

As the chart demonstrates, the City is currently on track to meet its long term renewal funding for

roads as determined by the LRAMP in 2013. Since 2013/14 the Council has met the requirements of the Asset Management Plan for roads through each year’s annual budget. As the budget allocation grows; continuing to meet the requirements of the AMP will start to become obvious out on the ground, as the volume of road renewal increases and the current backlog decreases.

 

Whilst the targets in terms of overall renewal expenditure are either being met or exceeded (red columns matching blue columns). More detailed investigation has been undertaken on the mix of rural single lane seal roads and urban works. This investigation has highlighted the mix of urban and rural as an area in need of some possible improvement – particularly when considered in the context of urban and rural expenditure for all infrastructure assets.

 

As an example of the current rural and urban split, in the 2015/16 Draft Budget, the City is planning to undertake major urban community infrastructure works to areas such as the Busselton Foreshore and Jetty (approx.$12.6M) , townscape and foreshore works in Busselton, Dunsborough and Yallingup (approx. $1.2M), and Vasse Newton Ovals ($1.08M). This total urban expenditure approx. $14.9M, further highlights a current disparity between infrastructure projects undertaken in the urban areas and those undertaken in the rural districts.

 

The City has also received funding confirmation for the Busselton Regional Airport Stage 2 Development. This will see a major upgrade to the Airport infrastructure including the runway, carpark and terminal. This is expected to begin in the 2016/17 financial year.

 

The funding amount of $55.9M for the upgrade of Airport infrastructure also places increased emphasis on the priority rural single lane seal roads as increased visitors to the region over time could possibly translate to increased traffic through the rural district and other tourism routes – rather than through the main suburban residential areas of the City.

 

Although the disparity between urban and rural can be somewhat justified by concentration of population and high use of these areas, a balance needs to be found to ensure that one sub-set of the City’s infrastructure assets – namely the rural single lane seal roads, doesn’t fall behind all other infrastructure in terms of overall average condition. As shown in more detail below, the rural single lane seal roads make up a large portion of the total km of poor condition roads within the City.

Chart 2 Rural Single Lane Seal Distance by Condition

 

 

As the above chart shows, there is approximately 36km of single lane seal country roads between condition 8-10, which just under 50% of the total 82km of single lane seal roads. These poor condition single lane seal roads also represent a high proportion of the overall sealed road network in condition 8-10. The total sealed roads at this condition is 82km, of which, just under 50% (36km) are single lane seal roads.

 

Although these rural roads represented a high proportion of poor condition roads, the initial asset management plan for roads and subsequent ten year schedule of works was formulated with a bias towards urban roads on the basis of larger volumes of traffic, servicing greater numbers of ratepayers and economies of scale in the amount of roads that can be renewed in any given year. This roughly equated to a 70%/30% funding split in favour of urban roads over rural single lane seal roads.

 

This approach and funding split follows a logical sequence in terms of the total kilometers of road and the percentage split between urban and rural single lane seal roads. However, when these two subsets are viewed on the basis of overall condition measured against proportion of the network, the single lane seal roads; although only 8% of the sealed road network (82km of a total 840km) represent around 45% (36km out of a total 81km) of total kilometers of worst condition (8,9 and 10) sealed roads. Once a road reaches condition 8 and upwards to condition 10, it is considered to be at intervention level and requiring some form of renewal works including asphalt overlay and reconstruction.

 

Modelling – Scheduling of Works

 

Modelling has been undertaken to determine a more appropriate funding split that would allow the renewal of the eight priority rural single lane seal roads (Table 1) to be expedited without compromising any minimum requirements for renewal in other areas as set out by the LRAMP

 

The modelling was based around achieving the renewal of the 37km of priority rural single lane seal roads over a period of between five and seven years. The outcomes of the modelling process are provided in more detail within the financial implications section of this report.

 


 

Modelling – Width Standards

 

In conjunction with the modelling, a review of reconstruction methods was undertaken to assess possible savings through reduced clearing and modified reconstruction methods. The outcomes of this review are shown in Attachment C.

 

The modelling was undertaken on the basis of a reduced clearing as set out within the review. As detailed within Attachment B, the aim of the modified construction method is to provide a more cost-effective method by minimising clearing and allowing for accelerated project timeframes whilst maintaining adequate levels of driver safety.

 The adoption of a modified construction method will allow for a greater lineal length of road construction for the same project vale, the additional length is largely dependent on the amount and density of vegetation that would have been required to be cleared. The roads with a lower level or more sparsely vegetated roads would result in minimal savings and the roads with dense of heavy vegetation will see the most significant gains in respect to length of road upgrade. It is anticipated that this modified construction method may achieve between a 5% (minor clearing) and 21% (major clearing) increase in the upgraded length. Based on the average construction costs of a rural road being $500,000/km (Generic design) this would equate to a saving of between $25,000 to $100,000, which would be used to construct additional road length.

 

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

Austroads Guide to Road Design Part 6 refers to roadside design, safety barriers and clear zones requirements. As a part of the City's road upgrades, design staff aim to improve the safety of the road environment as a part of all upgrade projects. The average clear zone required for the City's rural roads that are designed for a travel speed of 80km/h is between six (6) to eight (8) metres from the edge of carriageway.  Due to a number of factors influencing roadside clearing of vegetation in rural areas design officers have compromised the clear zones to not extend beyond the back edge of the new table drains (similar to that shown in STD RD07).

 

Speed zoning of rural roads is under the control of Main Roads WA. A considerable number of the City's rural roads are de-restrict speed zone (110mk/h) due to Main Roads policy that does not support posting a speed limit on narrow sealed roads or gravel roads. The City can request that Main Roads review the speed zoning for two lane sealed roads in rural areas and under certain circumstances Main Roads may apply an 80km/h area speed zone, however each site would need to be assessed by Main Roads on their individual merits.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The data from Asset Management Plans is incorporated into the Long Term financial Plan and in this

way informs the Corporate Business Plan and Annual Budget.

 

The intention of the Road Asset Renewal  Policy is to ensure that all funds generated by the asset renewal rate increase as per the Council’s Long Term financial Plan, plus any surplus of Council’s existing own source renewal funding are transferred to and from the Road Asset Renewal Reserve. This provides  a clear understanding of the amount of funds generated and where they are spent and also allow for longer term planning of works to take place.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

The proposals within this report do not have an adverse effect on the current ‘bottom line’ of the LTFP in terms of road expenditure. The report does not recommend any increases in City allocated funding for road expenditure. It is based on City contributions for road expenditure remaining as predicted within the current LTFP.

 

Table 2 provides an overview of the projected road funding until 2024/25. All the renewal works identified within the LRAMP are funded thorough these avenues on an annual basis. Details on each of the funding sources is provided in more detail below. Any adjustment to the funding split of urban and rural expenditure will need to be made within these funding sources.

 

Table 2:  Projected Roads Funding

 

Financial Year

 

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

2024-2025

Total

Funding Source

 

Direct Grant

             306,400

             321,720

                337,806

                   354,696

              372,431

            391,053

                 410,605

                 431,136

          452,692

                     475,327

                  3,853,866

 

Roads to Recovery

         1,904,000

          2,203,000

                667,000

                   667,000

              767,000

            767,000

                 767,000

                 767,000

          767,000

                     790,000

               10,066,000

 

Regional Road Group

         1,215,000

          1,200,000

             1,200,000

                1,200,000

          1,200,000

        1,200,000

             1,200,000

             1,200,000

       1,200,000

                  1,200,000

               12,015,000

 

City General Road Funding

             995,000

          1,050,000

             1,200,750

                1,253,276

          1,307,641

        1,363,908

             1,422,145

             1,482,420

       1,544,805

                  1,787,409

               13,407,355

 

City Funded Road Reserve

         1,065,000

          1,420,000

             1,775,000

                2,130,000

          2,130,000

        2,130,000

             2,130,000

             2,130,000

       2,130,000

                  2,193,900

               19,233,900

 

Total Roads Capital

         5,485,400

$6,194,720

$5,180,556

$5,604,973

$5,777,072

$5,851,961

$5,929,750

$6,010,556

$6,094,497

$6,446,636

               58,576,121

 

Total less Regional Road Group

         4,270,400

          4,994,720

             3,980,556

                4,404,973

          4,577,072

        4,651,961

             4,729,750

             4,810,556

       4,894,497

                  5,246,636

               46,561,121

 

Direct Grant funds are an annual allocation to each Council based on the asset preservation value as determined by the Western Australian Grants Commission. These are fully funded by the State and are not restricted to any particular group of roads.

 

Regional Road Group funds are distributed by the State Government and are administered by Regional Road Groups (RRG) as Road Project Grants. These are provided on the basis on two thirds funding from the State and one third funding from the Local Government. These funds can only be spent within a pre-determined list of roads as set by the RRG. This predetermined list includes roads that are deemed to be of regional significance as agreed by the RRG and ratified by the State Government.

 

None of the rural single lane seal priority roads are included in the current RRG List for funding for Road Project Grants, and therefore these funds have been excluded from the modelling. The City continues to make representations to have these roads considered for RRG Funding in the future.

                                                                                      

Roads to Recovery is a Federal Government funded program which supports the maintenance and renewal of the nation’s local road infrastructure assets. It is not restricted to particular roads, however Councils need to demonstrate improved safety, economic and social outcomes with each proposed project.

 

The predicted Roads to Recovery funding for 2015/16 and 2016/17 include supplementary funding brought about by agreement at a federal government level that will see the fuel excise (the main fuel tax in Australia) increase in February and August each year in line with the consumer price index and these additional funds distributed out through the Roads to Recovery program. This has previously not been the case.

 

Any continued increases from 2016/17 onwards have not been considered as part of the modelling undertaken within this report. This is on the basis that although further increases past 2016/17 are theoretically possible, they are not confirmed beyond the term of the federal government and therefore it would it would be difficult to predict any timing and amounts to include in the modelling.

 

City General Road Funding is road funding that is allocated by the City from the general rates raised within the given year. There are no restrictions as to which roads this funding can be spent on. City Funded Road Reserve are funds generated by the Specific rate increase for roads as detailed within the road renewal policy. This funding must be spent on renewal of City managed roads, but is not restricted to any particular roads.

 

Direct grants, Roads to Recovery, City general and City funded road reserve figures have formed the basis for available funds used within the modelling process.

 

With the available budget determined (via Table 2), the next step in the modelling process was to estimate the annual renewal cost for the priority rural single lane seal roads; which in turn, determines the remaining funds for other renewal works as demonstrated within the modelling results table.

 

Table 3 (below) shows the renewal cost for each of the single lane sections on the priority roads in 2015 dollars. These costs are inflated within the models to best determine the actual costs of the works depending on when they would be theoretically scheduled. This inflation has been estimated at three percent per annum.

 

These costs and associated inflation provide the basis for the Ave Expenditure priority rural single lane seal roads figure in Table 3. The cost per kilometer is based on the Reduced Clear Zone Method as detailed within attachment B.

 


 

Table 3 Priority Rural Single Lane Seal Roads

 

Road Name

Total Single Lane Seal to be Renewed

km

Cost per km

2015 $

Renewal Cost

2015 $

Tom Cullity Drive

1.9

 

395,000

757,610

Puzey Road

4.5

395,000

1,761,700

Yelverton Road

4.7

395,000

1,837,540

North Jindong Road

4.4

395,000

1,736,420

Yoongarillup Road

3.1

395,000

1,239,115

Boallia Road

5.3

395,000

2,101,795

Don Road

1.9

395,000

740,232

Chapman Hill Road

1.7

395,000

651,753

Wonnerup South Road

5.0

395,000

1,961,965

Hairpin Road

5.1

395,000

2,029,905

Total

37.5

 

14,818,035

 

As a broad overview of the modelling results shown in Table 4 (below). Renewing the 37km of rural single lane seal roads over five years produces an approximate 70% rural /30% urban split, six years shows a 60% rural /40% urban split and the seven year scenario is an approximate 50% rural /50% urban split.

 

Undertaking the renewal the works over five years will produce 7.5km of rural single lane seal reconstruction per year, six years averages 6.2km per year and seven years covers a yearly average of 5.36km of renewal.

 

The five year scenario produces an average of $1.2M p.a. for all other renewal works, six years shows $1.8M per year and seven years has the highest remaining average of $2.2M p.a.

 

Although all three allow the city to renew the 37km of priority single lane seal roads within the set timeframes; the scenario over six years provides the best balance of covering the rural single lane seal renewal plus other minimum renewal requirements as set out by the LRAMP.

 

Table 4 Modelling Results

 

 

5 Years

$ Ave per Annum

(inc. CPI)

% Split of Available Budget

6 Years

$ Ave Per Annum

(inc. CPI)

% Split of Available Budget

7 Years

$ Average Per Annum

(inc. CPI)

% Split of Available Budget

Average Total Budget Including External Funding

5,721,856

 

5,756,505

 

5,792,798

 

Less RRG Funding Main Roads 2/3Contribution 

800,000

 

800,000

 

800,000

 

Less Council 1/3 cont to RRG

400,000

 

400,000

 

400,000

 

Ave Available Budget

4,521,856

 

4,556,505

 

4,592,798

 

Ave Exp Priority Single Lane Seal Roads

3,251,309

72%

2,752,176

60%

2,373,972

52%

Remaining Amount

1,270,548

 

1,804,329

 

2,218,826

 

Other Expenditure

Second Coat Seals

261,323

 

217,770

 

186,660

 

Gravel Resheets

573,387

 

582,157

 

591,104

 

Urban 8,9 and 10's (Recon and Overlays)

435,838

 

1,004,402

 

1,441,063

 

Average Total 

1,270,548

28%

1,804,328

40%

2,218,827

48%

 

Table 4 provides an overview of the modelling outcomes of all three scenarios, with the percentage split of available budget column giving the ultimate budget split for each scenario; to determine the viability of renewing all 37km of priority rural single lane seal  roads over a period of between five to seven years, whilst maintaining minimum renewal requirements in other areas.

 

The available funding figures used are averages of those provided in table 1 over each of the three scenarios (5, 6 and 7 years). The available average budget is the total available, less the Regional Road Group Funding which is allocated to specific roads only – none of which are any of the identified single lane seal country roads.

 

Ave Expenditure Priority rural single lane seal  roads provides an yearly average figure generated by covering the 37km of renewal over the given period of five , six or seven years. Indicative annual averages are then allocated across second coat seals, gravel re-sheets and urban 8,9 and 10’s to illustrate how the remaining funds would be spread. This was important to determine whether the models were leaving enough renewal funds once the rural single lane seal works had been undertaken.

 

These other minimum requirements as shown in the table are second coat seals, gravel re-sheets and urban condition 8, 9 and 10’s. Details of these requirements are provided below.

 

Second Coat Seals are the final process in the reconstruction process which is applied within twelve months of the initial work when a bituminous surface is applied (as opposed to asphalt). After the road has been subjected to normal traffic for a sufficient period to ensure the embedding of the aggregate in the first coat of binder, the first coat is followed up the next year with a “second-coat” treatment which is considered to be an integral part of the initial seal waterproofing treatment.

 

Regular re-sheeting of gravel roads is required to maintain surface condition and sufficient pavement material to enable regular maintenance grading. This work is programmed annually and re-sheeting is conducted on an as required basis.

 

Condition 8 is regarded as the intervention level at which rehabilitation should take place. A segment of road at condition 8 or higher (9 and 10) would reflect its poor condition within the individual condition factors. The City uses a 0-10 condition rating system for roads where 0 is as new and 10 is end of life.

 

The average available expenditure was determined as the overall available funds less RRG Funding as previously outlined.

 

The works for the rural single lane seal  roads for all three models were based on the generic cost per kilometer of the Reduced Clear Zone Method, as detailed within Attachment B. This was deemed as $395,000 per kilometer.

 

The three models all allow the City to renew the 37km of rural single lane roads over each of the five, six and seven year periods. The five year model produces the best results in terms of time taken to complete the tasks, however produces the least amount of remaining funds for the remainder of the roads.

 

The six and seven year models produce $1.04M and $1.4m remaining funds respectively which will give more flexibility in terms of covering the other minimum requirements for renewal works  also over this period.

 

This report recommends that a 60%/40% split over a period of six years would be the best of the three options.

 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

This report is consistent with the City of Busselton’s Strategic Community Plan (2013) community

goals and objectives;

 

Well Planned, Vibrant and Active Places:

·    Infrastructure assets that are will maintained and responsibly managed to provide for future generations.

Connected City:

·    Transport options that provide greater links within our district and increase capacity for community participation.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

A risk assessment has been conducted for the proposal, none of the risks identified are considered to be medium or higher. The proposed model is considered to places adequate controls through chosen timeline as well as planned distribution of funds.

 

The highest ranking risk identified is outlined below.

 

Risk

Controls

Consequence

Likelihood

Risk Level

Worst condition urban roads not renewed when required.

Six year model allows funds for the renewal of these roads.

Minor 

Unlikely

L5

 

CONSULTATION

 

Public consultation was not undertaken as part of this process.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

The proposed 60%/40% rural / urban funding split to begin in 2016/17 has been recommended following a considered and detailed assessment of current and future road renewal requirements as set out by the LRAMP.

 

Renewal of the rural single lane seal roads is not intended to be undertaken at the expense of the worst condition urban roads and other minimum requirements for renewal, rather be undertaken in conjunction with these other required works.

 

This split will allow the city to expedite the renewal of the priority rural single lane seal roads over a period of five to seven years – with six years considered as the most appropriate timeframe.

 

Six years is considered to be the most appropriate timeframe as it provides and adequate balance between the rural single lane seal roads (60%) and the remaining minimum requirements works (40%). Although large groupings of works in urban areas will be reduced under this proposal, there will still be sufficient funds to renew the worst condition urban roads on an annual basis. As well as undertake other works such as gravel re-sheets and second coat seals.

 

This proposal also provides some balance in the context of the overall capital infrastructure spend between rural and urban areas. Numerous major capital infrastructure projects are being planned and undertaken in the City’s urban areas, these are either currently in progress or being planned to begin in the 2015/16 financial year. The renewal of rural single lane seal roads (to begin in 2016/17) in conjunction with these will provide some balance and ensure that this sub-set of infrastructure assets doesn’t ‘fall behind’ in terms of overall average condition.

 

The rural single lane seal roads (shown in Attachment A) once renewed, will also provide linkage between major roads and other City traffic distributor roads. As the attachment demonstrates, the priority rural roads provide linkage within the context of the overall network.

 

This ‘linkage’ will become more critical over time as the community (and indeed the region) expands and projects such as the airport expansion potentially bring more rural (district) travel as people fly in and migrate throughout the tourist drives.

 

The updated width standards based on the reduced clear zone method (Attachment B) will also assist in expediting the renewal of the priority rural single lane seal roads. The reduced clear zones as outlined within the attachment, will provide the best mix of reduced environmental impact whilst maintaining appropriate levels of driver safety. A reduced clear zone will allow the City to renew the road surface whilst still retaining trees and the ‘country feel’ of driving the rural roads.

 

The road renewal program has also been assisted in recent times, with increases in annual allocations to Roads to Recovery Funding. This has been brought about by policy changes at a Federal Government level relating to inflation of fuel excise and how this resulting income is distributed. How this additional income will be distributed in the long term (2017/18 and beyond) is unclear. However an ongoing allocation of this fuel excise funding to the Roads to recovery program will provide the City with additional road renewal funding.

 

Any increases in Roads to Recovery Funding from 2017/18 onwards have not been factored into the modelling given its unknown nature. If these additional funds were to continue, they would be in addition to the Roads to Recovery funds shown in Table 2.

 

CONCLUSION

 

The proposed renewal of the priority rural single lane seal roads over a period of six years will provide a balance in terms of where the City is renewing and upgrading its infrastructure, as well as expedite the renewal of a large portion of the total kilometers of worst condition roads within the City and its districts.

 

The proposed split of split of 60% rural (single lane seal roads) and 40% towards other minimum renewal requirements (worst condition urban roads, second coat seals and gravel re-sheets).is considered to be within the renewal expenditure parameters of the current LTFP and Local Roads AMP and meets the constraints of the Road Funding Policy which requires funds generated by the road renewal rate increase to be spent on road renewal.

 

Renewing the priority rural single lane seal roads will improve drive safety, reduced clear zones will protect the environment and improve the linkage between main roads and distributor roads within the City.

 


 

OPTIONS

 

The Council could choose not to adopt the officer’s recommendation and instead continue with the current utilisation of funding in the ten year plan for road renewal.

 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

If the Council adopts the officer’s recommendation, it will come into effect prior to the formulation of the 2016/17 annual budget.

 

Council Decision and Officer Recommendation

C1508/222              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council adopt a renewal program specific to the priority rural single lane seal roads, to be implemented as a guide to budget preparation over a period of six years, beginning in 2016/17:

 

a)         A funding split of 60% rural (single lane seal roads) and 40% towards other minimum renewal requirements. These minimum renewal requirements being, worst condition urban roads, second coat seals and gravel re-sheets.

b)        Apply the funding split within existing and predicted road renewal funding as set out in the Long Term Financial Plan, but excluding Regional Road Group Funding.

c)         Accepts reduced clear zones in appropriate locations where practicable as a balance between construction costs, safety and the social and environmental benefits achieved through a modified construction methods reducing the level of native vegetation removal.

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc

 


Council                                                                                      105                                                               12 August 2015

12.4           WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY

SUBJECT INDEX:

Waste Management

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE:

Environment and climate change risks and impacts are understood and managed.

BUSINESS UNIT:

Operations Services

ACTIVITY UNIT:

Waste Management

REPORTING OFFICER:

Waste Coordinator - Vitor Martins

Manager, Operations Services - George Workman

AUTHORISING OFFICER:

Director, Engineering and Works Services - Oliver Darby

VOTING REQUIREMENT:

Simple Majority

ATTACHMENTS:

Nil

  

 

PRÉCIS

 

This report presents the research outcomes as a result of the actions undertaken in regards to the ongoing review of the City’s waste disposal strategy and  recommends Council approval of the direction proposed, as well as the related long term financial plan for waste management infrastructure and services.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Like most other local government authorities in Australia, the City of Busselton has been heavily relying on landfill waste disposal as the main waste management practice for a significant number of years.

 

As a matter of current policy, the Department of Environment Regulation is no longer licensing waste landfills located in the Swan coastal plain.

 

Finding a suitable location for landfill sites is getting increasingly difficult, due to the demanding screening criteria, which include appropriate geology and hydrogeological conditions, water resources management and environmental protection considerations. Even when appropriate at the technical level, siting landfills is facing growing community concerns and is often met with opposition.

 

Therefore, securing long term waste disposal capacity has been an increasing concern for the City.

 

In 2012 as part of the CapeROC study of alternative waste sites a desktop due diligence review and site screening was undertaken in accordance with relevant criteria. This study was amended to include due diligence and screening of an additional 2 sites: the Ridge Road site (in 2014), and Wilcox Plantation site (in 2015).

 

In May 2014, the Council has endorsed the Capes Regional Organisation of Councils Strategic Waste Management Plan (CapeROC SWMP), which was later endorsed by the Shire of Augusta-Margaret River and by the Waste Authority. This document provides the short term direction for the development of waste infrastructure and services and formed the basis for CapeROC’s application for funding under the regional funding program

 

In June 2015, the first draft of a regional waste management study was submitted by Talis Consultants, which indicates that a regional waste management study (South West Waste Management Strategy) would provide significant savings to participant local governments as a result of cost-sharing, improved purchasing/contracting conditions and economies of scale in waste operations.

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

 

The Waste Avoidance and Recovery Act 2007 defines “Local Government Waste” as including, among other types, waste from residential sources (Section 3 (1)). This Act requires Local Governments to plan and provide waste services in a manner that is consistent with the State’s Waste Strategy (Sections 40 (2) (4)).

 

According to Section 67(a) of the Act a Local Government may provide for the proper disposal of waste by making an annual charge per waste receptacle.

 

RELEVANT PLANS AND POLICIES

 

The Western Australian Waste Strategy: “Creating the Right Environment” (2012) is the major policy providing waste management strategic direction in WA. According to the Vision set forth in the document “the primary goal of sustainable waste management strategies is to reduce the environmental impact of waste and maximise conservation of natural resources through reduced overall material use and increased materials and energy recovery.”

 

The Southwest Regional Blueprint report issued by the Southwest Development Commission of the Western Australian Government in December 2014 indicates as a regional priority:

 

“Sustaining environmental qualities

 

Acting to mitigate and adapt to climate change and sustain the environmental qualities which are intrinsic to the character of the South West “

 

Regional waste is identified as one of the associated objectives. Among the actions in the next 1-3 years is to:

 

“Build sub-regional waste facilities capable of recycling and managing waste to a forecast regional population of 500,000”

 

The Capes Regional Organisation of Councils Strategic Waste Management Plan (CapeROC SWMP), developed by City Officers, has been approved by Council on 20/05/2014 and it sets the short term direction for the development of waste management services and infrastructure. According to this plan, the recommended development of the existing Vidler Road site as a lined landfill will provide the airspace necessary (in the sort and medium term – up to 25 years) for an appropriate transition to an alternative site (local or regional).

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Long-term Financial Plan Implications

 

No long term financial plan implications are expected, as no funds are required from the waste reserve, as there is currently a provision of up to $100k per annum in the waste services operating budget to progress assessment of alternative sites. This relates to the consulting work that will need to be done to determine the one option that will be pursued in the future.

 

As the City progresses towards an approved solution, Council will be called upon to include additional funds for land purchase and site development, as needed.

 


 

STRATEGIC COMMUNITY OBJECTIVES

 

The long term plan for waste infrastructure and services is relevant to the Strategic Community Plan 2014:

 

Key Goal Area 2:               Well Planned, Vibrant and Active Places

 

Community Objective 2.3 Infrastructure assets are well maintained and responsibly managed to provide for future generations.

 

Key Goal Area 5:               Cared for and Enhanced Environment

 

Community Objective 5.3 Environment and climate change risks and impacts are understood and managed.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT

 

The recommendations within this report are aimed at progressing additional studies to support further decision-making, while keeping appropriate options open.

 

Therefore, no risks of medium or greater have been identified.

 

CONSULTATION

 

No consultation has been undertaken.

 

OFFICER COMMENT

 

For the 2014/2015 financial year the mandate on “Refuse Disposal” includes:

 

Finalisation of formal designation of a new local and/or regional waste disposal site and provide clear guidelines and timelines for the development of the site/s.

 

Demonstrate how research into other methods of waste disposal has been considered including research into waste to energy solutions.

 

Finalisation of formal designation of a new local and/or regional waste disposal site

 

The City is currently pursuing studies in order to be able to explore two alternative pathways in the future:

 

a)    to develop a local site;

b)    to participate in the development of a regional site (either with the Shire of Augusta-Margaret River or with the Southwest Regional Group).

 

In any event, formal designation of a site does require prior extensive due diligence, viability assessment and increasingly detailed site investigation and field studies, which will, in turn, will support a works approval and a license application, including any additional site specific legal requirements (e.g. Federal referrals for any clearing permits, environmental impact assessments, etc.).

 

The selection of a site for a waste facility is, therefore, a complex process that involves screening of a number of relevant criteria across a number of alternative sites for viability, followed by detailed field investigations and comparison of those sites for which preliminary viability was ascertained.

 

The CapeROC 2012 study, as recently updated, indicated a number of potential waste disposal site locations, 3 options within the Busselton district (Slee Road, Ridge Road and the Wilcox Plantation) and 3 options within the district of Augusta-Margaret River Shire (Lawson Road and George Road).

 

The previously preferred site was Ridge Road and, as such, it was subjected to a detailed flora survey a geotechnical study and preliminary viability assessment. The geotechnical study and preliminary viability assessment of the site did not yield a positive result, given the shallow groundwater level and, perhaps more importantly, its development was contingent upon confirmation of the de-proclamation – by the Department of Water – of the public drinking water catchment area status, which did not eventuate (contrary to previous Department of Water information).

 

At this point in time, further geotechnical and site modeling investigations are being undertaken, within the CapeROC framework, to determine preliminary viability assessment of Slee Road and Lawson Road as prospective waste landfill sites, with results expected in July 2015.

 

In the interim, as per the approved Strategic Waste Management Plan, Waste landfill Cell 1 at Vidler Road has been submitted to DER and approved in April 2015, and is now being constructed. It is due to be ready by the end of 2015/2016 financial year.

 

Dunsborough Waste Facility lined Cell 1 is expected to yield the City another 4 to 5 years (in addition to the 2 years at the existing disposal area). The current Vidler Road site, therefore, will accommodate the City’s short term needs while it considers alternative sites and a possible joint arrangement with other local government authorities, either via CapeROC or the Southwest Regional Group, in addition to the scenario of expansion of the Vidler Road site within the existing property boundaries.

 

In fact, in 2014 the City engaged consultant Bowman & Associates to provide the study of alternative scenarios to extend the footprint of the existing Vidler Road waste landfill site, the outcome of which point to a potential additional landfill capacity in excess of 25 years – if a regional arrangement cannot be pursued to the benefit of all local government authorities involved.

 

The Vidler Road site is considered a valuable asset for the City, because its potential development as a disposal site could yield waste disposal capacity well into the future, in accordance with the Bowman & Associates’ modeling work.

 

As such, the only formal site designation that can be recommended for adoption at this point in time is to pursue the existing Vidler Road site, so as to allow the appropriate transition time to an alternative site, either as a local solution for the City (as a short to medium term solution of up to 25 years) or as a regional facility (either under the CapeROC framework or in cooperation with a number of other local governments in the Southwest).

 

Provide clear guidelines and timelines for the development of the site/s

 

The guidelines for development of the site/s are as follows:

 

·    The City is to pursue the required arrangements to allow for the development of a regional waste management solution in cooperation with other local government authorities in the Southwest, in order to implement a waste management system with a strategic focus in the long term, and a cost-effective technical solution that can benefit from cost-sharing and economies of scale.

·    Until a Southwest regional system is achieved, officers are to pursue development of Cell 1 at Vidler Road in compliance with best practice environmental management standards, in accordance with the first phase expansion scenario proposed by Bowman & Associates.

·    This new Vidler Road site shall be operated either as the City’s waste landfill or as a regional landfill under CapeROC framework.

·    Although the City is pursuing Cell 1 only at this stage, the expansion scenario mentioned comprises the development of 5 waste landfill cells; development of Cell 1 will yield approximately 5 years of landfill capacity for the City (in addition to the 2 years remaining at the current site), thus allowing the City to transition to an alternative site (and negotiate any regional arrangements) while still keeping the option of further development in the future.

·    Transition from the current disposal site to newly built Cell 1 shall occur only after all viable airspace is exhausted at the current disposal site.

·    In regards to alternative disposal sites to progress under the CapeROC framework (or for the City, individually considered), officers are to pursue further investigations at the following screened sites:

Slee Road gravel pit, which is currently disturbed State Forest land

Wilcocks plantation, which is currently a pine tree plantation operated by Forest Products Commission

Lawson Road gravel pit, which is currently disturbed State Forest land

·    Depending on the outcome of these investigations, the site(s) that are deemed to provide the City with a minimum of 25 years of waste landfill capacity are to be further assessed, including detailed field studies (e.g. flora and fauna) and tenure arrangements (and possible off-sets) to be determined, depending on the specific situation.

·    It might be the case that the City or CapeROC can keep all 3 sites as future strategic reserve for the development of waste facilities.

 

Timelines for site development are as follows:

 

 

Demonstrate how research into other methods of waste disposal has been considered including research into waste to energy solutions

 

At best, alternative methods of waste disposal will be able to complement landfill disposal, thereby improving recycling and waste diversion performance. However, in an integrated waste management system, a waste landfill will remain a necessity.

 

This is because regardless of the alternative method, there will always be a residual fraction of the waste that will need to be landfilled (refuse from alternative waste treatment facilities), and because the technical downtime (for scheduled and corrective maintenance) of those facilities will require appropriate disposal, if only temporary.

As part of the preparation of the Strategic Waste Management Plan and ensuing studies, and, more recently, as part of the South West Group initiative (Bunbury-Wellington, CapeROC and Warren-Blackwood Group of Councils, collectively titled the South West Group), the following waste disposal methods were researched:

 

-      Composting (including 3 bin system)

-      Anaerobic digestion

-      Mechanical sorting of mixed waste (“dirty” material recovery facility)

-      Waste to energy

Mass burning (incineration)

Gasification

Pyrolysis

Waste to fuel (Solid Recovered Fuel production)

 

In order to complement other research information, City Officers held meetings with the following technology vendors:

 

-      Hitachi Zosen (waste to energy: mass burning and anaerobic digestion)

-      New Energy (waste to energy: gasification)

-      Refgas (waste to energy: pyrolysis)

 

In addition, a meeting was held with a representative from Rivers Regional Council, that are pursuing a mass burning waste to energy solution at Kwinana.

 

A summary of the comparative assessment of alternative waste disposal methods/options is presented as follows:

 

 

Composting

Anaerobic digestion

 

Mechanical sorting

Waste to energy

Cost implications

$ 2 M capital

 

$40 M capital

$40 M capital

$30 M to $400 M capital

Total % diversion from landfill

50%

50%

40%

70-95%

Short description

Biological treatment based on aerobic system. Implies 3 bin system upfront.

Energy intensive

Outputs: compost

Biological treatment based on anaerobic process, with biogas generation and possible power production.

Outputs: compost, liquid fertilizer, electric power

Mechanical screening and sorting

Energy intensive

Outputs: recovered material for recycling

 

Thermal processing of waste

Net power generation

Outputs: metals, ash, electric power.

Constraints

Lack of appropriate incentives (landfill levy)

Dependent on market for output (single potential user – Landsave)

Lack of appropriate incentives (landfill levy)

Dependent on market for output (single potential user – Landsave)

Lack of appropriate incentives (landfill levy)

Lack of appropriate incentives (landfill levy)

Relatively low conventional energy cost in the region

Relatively low waste quantities

Lack of heavy industrial users for the energy generated

 


 

Breakdown comparison of waste to energy options

 

 

Mass burning

Gasification

 

Pyrolysis

Solid Recovered Fuel

Cost implications

$ 400 M capital

 

$100 M capital

$100 M capital

$30 M capital

Total % diversion from landfill

90%

90%

90%

70%-90%

Short description

Based on direct combustion of waste, requires extensive pollution monitoring and control systems, which make it viable for substantial waste throughputs only

Based on thermal breakdown of waste in oxygen-starved conditions.

Modular design able to process smaller throughputs.

Based on thermal breakdown of waste in oxygen-deprived conditions.

Modular design able to process smaller throughputs.

Mechanical processing of waste to fuel specification standards, to be used by industry.

Constraints

Competing with relatively low electrical power cost in the region

Relatively low waste quantities

 

Competing with relatively low electrical power cost in the region

Relatively low waste quantities

 

Competing with relatively low electrical power cost in the region

Technology not fully demonstrated for mixed municipal solid waste

Dependent on market for output (industrial fuel users)

Relatively low waste quantities

 

 

An individual waste to energy solution or even a CapeROC-based waste to energy solution is not considered cost-effective in comparison to landfill disposal, because of the significant costs and relatively small waste quantities generated. On the other hand, even the viability of a waste to energy solution for the whole Southwest region is dependent upon a number of drivers, which include, among others, the adoption of a landfill levy in regional WA and a change in technology and energy market conditions that would reduce the associated infrastructure costs or increase revenue from energy sales.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Formal designation of an alternative site is currently dependent on further investigations, both under the CapeROC and the South West Group frameworks, in regards to the technical model of a regional waste management system and the site selection for a mutually agreed upon waste disposal facility.

 

Therefore, the continued development of the Vidler Road waste landfill site in accordance with the expansion scenario recommended by Bowman & Associates in 2014 (of up to 25 years of airspace capacity) still merits pursuing, on the basis that Cell 1 will give the City an expected waste disposal capacity of approximately 5 years, in addition to the 2 year left at the existing disposal site. Cells 2 to 5 can later be progressed if and as needed.

 

OPTIONS

 

The Council can decide not to pursue a regional waste management system with other local government authorities in the Southwest, in which case the City would have to rely on its own existing assets and potential alternative sites for future development. In this case, formal designation of a local site is dependent on geotechnical survey currently under way, as well as additional studies required, to determine a preferred site between the existing two best candidates (Slee Road and Wilcocks plantation).

 

 


 

TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

 

Implementation of this recommendation means that the City will be committed to pursuing additional studies to determine the best long term site(s) in regards to waste management.

 

This pre-supposes continuing to undertake a number of studies at least during the next 5 years.

 

Council Decision and Officer Recommendation

C1508/223              Moved Councillor T Best, seconded Councillor J Green

 

That the Council:

a)      continue the development of Dunsborough Waste Facility (Vidler Road) landfill, thus securing waste disposal capacity for the sort medium term, on a “as needed” basis with regard to the full development potential (of up to 25 years);

b)     progress investigations and studies for a regional CapeROC waste management system;

c)      progress investigations and studies in cooperation with the other local government authorities in the Southwest region for a regional waste management system.

 

CARRIED 9/0

En Bloc